Speakers

The Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education speakers include experts in the academics and government officials.

Karski Institute 2016

Jacques Berlinerblau, PhD, holds separate doctorates in ancient Near Eastern languages and literatures, and Sociology. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Dr. Berlinerblau has published on a wide variety of issues ranging from the composition of the Hebrew Bible, to the sociology of heresy, to modern Jewish intellectuals, to African-American and Jewish-American relations. His articles on these and other subjects have appeared in Biblica, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Semeia, Biblical Interpretation, Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, Hebrew Studies, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and History of Religions.

He has published four books, including: Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibility of American Intellectuals (Rutgers University Press); The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously (Cambridge University Press), and Thumpin’ It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today’s Presidential Politics (Westminster John Knox). His most recent book, How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) was released September 2012.

Reverend Dennis McManus, D.Litt. has taught at Georgetown University since 1997. He holds a master’s degree in historical ethics from Georgetown University and a doctorate from Drew University in historical theology. At present, he is on the faculty of the Center for Jewish Civilization, where he offers courses in the history of Christian-Jewish conflict, autobiography in the Holocaust, and the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue. Father McManus has served for the last four years as Consultant for Jewish Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), where he staffs the two official dialogues between the Jewish community and the Catholic Church in the United States. He also belongs to the Church Relations Committee of the United States Memorial Holocaust Museum and from 1999-2008 was a member of the editorial board of The Stimulus Foundation of New York that publishes works devoted to Catholic-Jewish history and relations. From 2009- 2011, he was the personal delegate of the Archbishop of New York to the Jewish community of New York City. Since 1997, Fr. McManus has membered on the board of directors of the Anti-Defamation League/USCCB joint program in Holocaust education known as Bearing Witness, offered nationally in Catholic dioceses. He is also director of the Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education. Additionally, he teaches annually in the Holocaust education workshop at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City. Fr. McManus’ research interests lie in two fields: first, the relationship of Jews with early Christians and second, the meaning of Judaism in Roman Catholic liturgy. As general editor of The Ancient Christian Writers Series (Paulist Press, New York) from 1993-2007, and Drew University’s translation editor from 1995-1997 for its new series, Ancient Christian Commentary (IVPress, Downers Grove), he helped to highlight the interaction of Christianity and Judaism in early Church writing. Fr. McManus has written numerous articles on this and other historical topics in The Word Set Free (ADL, 2000); The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian-Jewish Relations (2002) and “The Jewish Background of the Celibacy of Jesus” in The Celibacy of Jesus (St. Botolph Press, 2013).

Robert Lieber is a Professor of Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University, where he has previously served as Chair of the Government Department and Interim Chair of Psychology. He is an authority on American foreign policy and U.S. relations with the Middle East and Europe. He was born and raised in Chicago, received his undergraduate education at the University of Wisconsin and his PhD at Harvard. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has taught at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California, Davis, and has been Visiting Fellow at the Atlantic Institute in Paris, the Brookings Institution in Washington, and Fudan University in Shanghai.

Professor Lieber's latest book is entitled, Power and Willpower in The American Future: Why the US is Not Destined to Decline (Cambridge University Press, 2012). His most recent book prior to this was The American Era: Power and Strategy for the 21st Century (Cambridge University Press, 2007). As one reviewer described it, "This may be the best book on American foreign policy written since September 11." In addition, Lieber is author or editor of fourteen other books on international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and energy security.

Professor Lieber has lectured widely in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In the policy realm, he has been a foreign policy advisor in several presidential campaigns and consultant to the State Department and for National Intelligence Estimates. His articles and op-eds have appeared in scholarly journals, magazines and newspapers, including International Security, Foreign Policy, American Political Science Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The National Interest, Commentary, Internationale Politik (Berlin), Politique Etrangere (Paris), International Affairs (London), Harper's, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Ha'aretz (Tel Aviv), and Asharq Al-Awsat (London), among others, and his media appearances have included The News Hour with Jim Lehrer on PBS TV, ABC TV's Good Morning America and Nightline, NBC and CBS network news, the O'Reilly Factor on Fox TV, Voice of America, BBC World Service, and other radio and TV programs in Europe, the Arab world and Israel. Among his assorted credits is a walk-on part in the Alfred Hitchock film classic, North by Northwest.

Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor is the Vice President of Philanthropy at the World Union for Progressive Judaism which serves over 1,400 Reform/Progressive/Liberal/Reconstructionist Jewish congregations and over 1.8 million members in 49 countries around the world. He is a recognized expert in interfaith relations, and a well-known lecturer and author of numerous articles.

Gary served as the Director of the Education Division at the Anti-Defamation League and as the Director of Interfaith Affairs. He served as Senior Rabbi at Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in NYC for eight years.

He was the Director of Interreligious Affairs at the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now URJ), and the Associate Director of the Commission on Social Action of Reform Judaism. During his tenure there he also served as the Associate Director of the Commission on Jewish Education and the Director of Adult Education.

A graduate of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, from which he also received his Doctor of Divinity degree in 2009, he was on the faculty of the Religion and History Departments of Sarah Lawrence College.  Additionally, Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor was a Lecturer at the New York University School of Continuing Education and a member of the faculty of the HUC-JIR School of Education as Lecturer in Intertestamental Literature and Jewish Ethics. He was appointed as the Khatib Chair of Comparative Religion at St. Joseph’s College in New York for the academic year of 2012. Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor served congregations in Mahopac, New York; San Juan, Puerto Rico; St. Louis, Missouri; and Elizabeth, New Jersey. He served as rabbi at Congregation Da’at Elohim – Temple of Universal Judaism on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, for 5 years and has just been appointed rabbi of Congregation Shirat HaYam in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor is the editor and principal writer of Shalom / Salaam: A Resource for Jewish / Muslim Dialogue. His most recent book is called A Jewish View of Cults. He is a past chair of the Central Conference of American Rabbis’ Interreligious Affairs Committee; on the Executive Committee of the National Council of Synagogues; served as the Program Chair of the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations; served on the Executive Board of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, and on the Alumni Board of the Sarah Lawrence College. He was the founding Chair of the Interfaith Assembly on Homelessness and Housing, and was a member of the Board of Homes for the Homeless in New York City.

E. Thomas Wood is an American journalist, historian and freelance writer. From 2005 until 2011, he worked as a reporter for NashvillePost.com, a local business and political news website in Nashville, Tennessee, and related publications.

An expert on the life of Jan Karski, Wood published Karski: How One Man Tried to Stop the Holocaust. Wood also co-wrote, narrated and furnished much of the interview footage for his 71-minute documentary film on the wartime missions of Karski. Additionally, Wood has lectured on the life of Jan Karski at countless museums and universities across the United States.

In the 1990s, Wood regularly contributed to The New York Times from Nashville and other locations (including Romania, where he lectured at universities in 1997), and to The Wall Street Journal. He was the founding editor of Bank Director magazine and served as editor and publisher of Nashville Life and Business Nashville magazines. He was a business reporter and interim business editor at The Tennessean in the early 1990s.

He has been a member since 1998 of the state-chartered Tennessee Holocaust Commission.

A native of Nashville, Wood is a graduate of Vanderbilt University. He holds a Master's degree in European Studies from Pembroke College, Cambridge.

Robert King "Bob" Wittman was a highly decorated FBI Special Agent.  As a result of specialized training in art, antiques, jewelry and gem identification, Wittman served as the FBI's "top investigator and coordinator in cases involving art theft and art fraud. During his 20 years with the FBI, Wittman helped recover more than $300 million worth of stolen art and cultural property, resulting in the prosecution and conviction of numerous individuals. In 2005, he was instrumental in the creation of the FBI's rapid deployment Art Crime Team (ACT). He was named the ACT's Senior Investigator and was responsible for instructing the newly formed team. He also was instrumental in the recovery of colonial North Carolina's copy of the original Bill of Rights in 2005, after it was stolen by a Union soldier in 1865. Wittman represented the United States around the world, conducting investigations and instructing international police and museums in recovery and security techniques. After his 20 years with the FBI working against art theft, he continues to use his expertise as an art security consultant for the private sector. In 2010 Wittman published his memoir Priceless which recounts his career and activities while working for the FBI as an undercover agent.

Reuven Azar assumed his position as the Deputy Head of Mission at the Israeli Embassy in the US in January 2014. He previously served as Head of Middle East Research in the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA). From 2010 to 2012, Reuven was the Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Israel in Amman.

Since the completion of the MFA cadet training program in 1994, he held mostly Middle East related positions, such as Head of the Iran Sanctions Team and Director of Middle East Economic Research. During his carrier Reuven covered different aspects of cooperation and negotiations with the Palestinian Authority, as well as research on Palestinian issues. He served four years in Cairo as Head of Economic & Trade Department at the Embassy of Israel. In a previous round in Washington, DC (2003-2006) he served as Counselor for Political Affairs.

Reuven was born in Argentina in 1967 and made Aliyah (immigrated) with his family to Jerusalem, Israel at the age of 13. He served in a Paratroopers battalion of the Israeli Defense Forces from 1985 to 1988 and was a reservist combat Sergeant up to 2008. Reuven has both an MA and BA from the Department of International Relations at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He is married to Rachel and a father to Roni ,Ofir and Oren. Reuven speaks fluent Spanish and Arabic, In addition to English and Hebrew. 

Abraham H. Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) 1987 to 2015, is world-renowned as a leader in the fight against anti-Semitism, bigotry and discrimination. He is the co-author of Viral Hate: Containing Its Spread on the Internet (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and author of Jews & Money: The Story of a Stereotype (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), The Deadliest Lies: The Israel Lobby and the Myth of Jewish Control (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) and Never Again? The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism (HarperSanFrancisco, 2003).

In the forefront of major issues of the day, including the rise of global anti-Semitism, the war on terrorism, church/state issues, religious intolerance and issues relating to the Holocaust, he consistently speaks out against hatred and violence wherever they occur. Mr. Foxman regularly confers with elected officials and community leaders here and abroad.  He has had consultations in Europe, Russia, Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, China, Japan, South Africa and Argentina, and with Palestinian leaders, on problems of ethnic hatred, violence, terrorism and promoting democracy.  He has had multiple audiences with Pope John Paul II, with Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis.  Mr. Foxman is a passionate supporter of the State of Israel and a voice for peace in the Middle East.

A Holocaust survivor, Mr. Foxman was a member of the President’s United States Holocaust Memorial Council, appointed by Presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton. He has been a participant of official Presidential delegations to special events in Europe and Israel.

Born in Poland in 1940, Mr. Foxman was saved from the Holocaust by his Polish Catholic nursemaid who baptized and raised him as a Catholic during the war years. His parents survived the war, but 14 members of his family were lost. He arrived in America in 1950 with his parents. A graduate of the Yeshiva of Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY, Mr. Foxman has a B.A. in political science from the City College of the City University of New York, graduating with honors in history. He holds a J.D. degree from New York University School of Law, and did graduate work in advanced Judaic studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary and in international economics at The New School for Social Research. Mr. Foxman is fluent in several languages. He joined ADL in 1965.

Thomas R. Klein concentrates his practice in civil litigation, arbitration and alternative dispute resolution involving the following areas: general commercial matters, bankruptcy, intellectual property, insurance, energy, environmental issues and administrative law cases, with a specialization in art and cultural property litigation and advice.

Tom most recently served as the Managing Partner of Andrews Kurth's Washington, DC office and on the firm's Policy Committee. Mr. Kline also received the medal of Cyprus Technical University for protecting the cultural heritage of Cyprus.

Meital Orr teaches courses of Jewish literature and Hebrew language at Georgetown University's Center for Jewish Civilization. Orr holds a doctorate in Modern Jewish Literature from Harvard University, as well as an M.A. from Columbia University in Hebrew Literature. Previously, she has taught Modern Jewish Literature at Harvard University's Near East languages and Cultures Department, Advanced Conversational Hebrew and Elementary Hebrew at Columbia University's Hebrew Department.

Irene Weiss was born Iren Fogel on November 21, 1930, in Bótrágy, Czechoslovakia (now Batrad’, Ukraine) to Meyer and Leah Fogel.

Irene married Martin Weiss in 1949, and they moved to northern Virginia in 1953. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in education from American University and taught in the Fairfax County Public School system in Virginia for 13 years. Irene and Martin have three children and four grandchildren, and Irene is a volunteer at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Eric Langenbacher, PhD, is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Senior Honors Program in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics, political culture and political films. He studied in Canada before starting graduate work in the Government Department and Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown in 1996. He was awarded a Fulbright grant in 1999-2000 and held the Ernst Reuter Fellowship at the Free University of Berlin in 1999-2000, the Hopper Memorial Fellowship at Georgetown in 2000-2001, and was selected School of Foreign Service faculty member of the year by the 2009 graduating class. He has been teaching in the Government Department since Fall 2002, and also has taught at George Washington University and in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Dr. Langenbacher’s dissertation, defended with distinction in September 2002, forms the basis of his book manuscript “Memory Regimes and Political Culture in Contemporary Germany” currently under review at several presses. He has also published edited volumes, "Lauching the Grand Coalition: The 2005 Bundestag Election and the Future of German Politics," (with Yossi Shain) "Power and the Past: Collective Memory and International Relations," "Between Left and

Right: The 2009 Bundestag Election and the Transformation of the German Party System," and (with Jeffrey Anderson) "From the Bonn to the Berlin Republic: Germany at the Twentieth Anniversary of Unification."

His research interests center on political culture, collective memory, political institutions, public opinion and German and European politics. He has published in German Politics and Society, German Politics, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Politics and Ethics and in several edited volumes. He has also planned and run dozens of short programs on various aspects of U.S. politics and society for visitors from abroad.

Costel Nastasie is the founder and president of Roma Dignity. Originally from Romania, he left his country after confronting discrimination and racism at a very young age. 70 years ago, Costel’s family was subjected to deportation from their village in Transnistria under the Antonescu regime.

Currently, he lives in Brussels as a Belgian citizen. For a number of years, he worked as a Peace Keeper and mediator for the Roma community in Brussels.

With the French organization Yahad-In Unum, he returned to Romania to conduct interviews with Roma who survived the deportation. To this day, their 5 research trips have been completed in Romania and one in the Republic of Macedonia. These trips have enabled the collection of proof of this widely unknown genocide.

Since 2013, Costel Nastasie has been the president of the organization, Roma Dignity, the project he envisioned to centralize an archival base and documentation of the persecutions endured by the Roma population during World War II, and to teach this history to both young Roma and the public at large.

Ori Z. Soltes has spent a lifetime wrestling with questions that resonate through the history of the human experience. His dynamic teaching, lecturing, curating and writing reflect a broad series of interests and a unique ability to combine them in unusual ways that are thought-provoking and both challenging and intellectually exciting.

He currently teaches theology, philosophy and art history at Georgetown University. He has also taught across diverse disciplines for many years at The Johns Hopkins University, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, Siegel College in Cleveland, and other colleges and universities.

Dr. Soltes has lectured at dozens of museums across the country, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. He has been interviewed for a score of programs on archaeological, religious, art, literary and historical topics on CNN, the History Channel and Discovery Channel, and he hosted a popular series on Ancient Civilizations for middle school students.

For seven years, Dr. Soltes was Director and Chief Curator of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum, where he created over 80 exhibitions focusing on aspects of history, ethnography and contemporary art. He has also curated diverse contemporary and historical art exhibits at other sites, nationally and internationally. As Director of the National Jewish Museum he co-founded the Holocaust Art Restitution Project and has spent nearly 20 years researching and consulting on the issue of Nazi-plundered art.

Nearly 250 publications—books, articles, and catalogue essays—have included, among others: Eight Thousand Years of Georgian Art; Fixing the World: Jewish American Painters in the Twentieth Century; Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw from the Same Source; Searching for Oneness: Mysticism in the Jewish, Christian and Muslim Traditions; The Ashen Rainbow: the Arts and the Holocaust; Untangling the Tangled Web: Why the Middle East is Such a Mess; and Famous Jewish Trials: From Jesus to Jonathan Pollard.

Dr. Soltes leads annual study tours to museums and art and archaeological sites throughout Europe, the Middle East and parts of Africa. When not wandering around the world, he resides in the Washington, DC area with his wife and two rambunctious boys who keep him tidily in tow.

Mark Riebling is a U.S. historian, essayist, and policy analyst. He has written on national security, the history of ideas, and Vatican foreign policy during Cold War and Second World War. He is the author of two books Wedge: The Secret War between the FBI and CIA and Church of Spies: The Pope’s Secret War Against Hitler.

From 2001 to 2010 Riebling served as Editorial Director at the Manhattan Institute and directed its Book Program. Previously he had worked as a book editor in the Adult Trade Division at Random House. He did graduate work in political philosophy at Columbia University, studied English at Dartmouth College, and majored in philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley.

Reverend Patrick Desbois, the president of the Yahad–In Unum Association, has devoted his life to confronting anti-Semitism and furthering Catholic-Jewish understanding.

Since 2001 he has led a truly historic undertaking. Working closely with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum staff and using the Museum’s archives to aid his search, he and his team have crisscrossed the countryside of Eastern Europe in an effort to locate every mass grave and site at which Jews were killed during the Holocaust. To date, they have identified 1,617 execution sites. They are also collecting artifacts and, most significantly, recording video testimonies from eyewitnesses—many of whom are speaking publicly for the first time. These invaluable testimonies will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Father Desbois’ extraordinary work to preserve the memory of Eastern Europe’s former Jewish community and to advance understanding of the crimes committed there during the Holocaust has received international media attention.

Warren Marcus works in the Education Division of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. He focuses on program and resource development for the Division, while still assisting with teacher professional development. For eleven years he presented onsite teacher workshops, develops programs and resources and assists with programs such as law enforcement training and student programming. He was the Director of Teacher Workshops and Conferences and annually organized and presented teacher workshops for up to 500 teachers around the nation. He has directed the Belfer National Conferences for Teachers at the Museum from 1997-2006, and he was the lead instructor for 200 high school teachers at the Conferences in 1995 and 1996. Warren taught middle and high school for seventeen years, also serving in a variety of administrative positions, including two department chair positions. He was a national finalist for social studies teacher of the year in 1992 in The Disney Channel Salutes the American Teacher Awards Program, and in 2001 and 2002, he was a national judge for the program. He is a graduate of Brown University and received a Master’s Degree in Education from Harvard University.

Moran Stern is an Adjunct Lecturer at the Center for Jewish Civilization at Georgetown University and a doctoral candidate in Government & Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. At Georgetown, Moran has instructed courses on the History of Zionism, Jewish Civilization, and Israel. Previously, Stern taught at American University’s Center for Israel Studies. In addition, Moran has served as a commentator for the Washington Jewish Week where he wrote about Israeli politics, society, security, Judaism, the Middle East, Turkey, and U.S.-Israel relations. Stern has also appeared in venues such as The Atlantic and the Jewish Daily Forward. Moran is a native of Israel, served in the IDF, speaks fluent Hebrew and Arabic, and is passionate about all Middle East affairs.

Karski Institute 2015

Robert Lieber is a Professor of Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University, where he has previously served as Chair of the Government Department and Interim Chair of Psychology. He is an authority on American foreign policy and U.S. relations with the Middle East and Europe. He was born and raised in Chicago, received his undergraduate education at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at Harvard. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has taught at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California, Davis, and has been Visiting Fellow at the Atlantic Institute in Paris, the Brookings Institution in Washington, and Fudan University in Shanghai.

Professor Lieber's latest book is entitled, Power and Willpower in The American Future: Why the US is Not Destined to Decline (Cambridge University Press, 2012). His most recent book prior to this was The American Era: Power and Strategy for the 21st Century (Cambridge University Press, 2007). As one reviewer described it, "This may be the best book on American foreign policy written since September 11." In addition, Lieber is author or editor of fourteen other books on international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and energy security.

Professor Lieber has lectured widely in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In the policy realm, he has been a foreign policy advisor in several presidential campaigns and consultant to the State Department and for National Intelligence Estimates. His articles and opeds have appeared in scholarly journals, magazines and newspapers, including International Security, Foreign Policy, American Political Science Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The National Interest, Commentary, Internationale Politik (Berlin), Politique Etrangere (Paris), International Affairs (London), Harper's, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Ha'aretz (Tel Aviv), and Asharq Al-Awsat (London), among others, and his media appearances have included The News Hour with Jim Lehrer on PBS TV, ABC TV's Good Morning America and Nightline, NBC and CBS network news, the O'Reilly Factor on Fox TV, Voice of America, BBC World Service, and other radio and TV programs in Europe, the Arab world and Israel. Among his assorted credits is a walk-on part in the Alfred Hitchock film classic, North by Northwest.

Reverend Dennis McManus, D.Litt. has taught at Georgetown University since 1997. He holds a master’s degree in historical ethics from Georgetown University and a doctorate from Drew University in historical theology. At present, he is on the faculty of the Program for Jewish Civilization in the School of Foreign Service, where he offers courses in the history of Christian-Jewish conflict, autobiography in the Holocaust, and the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue. Father McManus has served for the last four years as Consultant for Jewish Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), where he staffs the two official dialogues between the Jewish community and the Catholic Church in the United States. He also belongs to the Church Relations Committee of the United States Memorial Holocaust Museum and from 1999-2008 was a member of the editorial board of The Stimulus Foundation of New York that publishes works devoted to Catholic-Jewish history and relations. From 2009- 2011, he was the personal delegate of the Archbishop of New York to the Jewish community of New York City. Since 1997, Fr. McManus has membered on the board of directors of the Anti-Defamation League/USCCB joint program in Holocaust education known as Bearing Witness, offered nationally in Catholic dioceses. He is also director of the newly founded Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education at Georgetown University, which sponsors a weeklong, intensive program in Holocaust education for high school teachers from across the U.S. Additionally, he teaches annually in the Holocaust education workshop at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City. Fr. McManus’ research interests lie in two fields: first, the relationship of Jews with early Christians and second, the meaning of Judaism in Roman Catholic liturgy. As general editor of The Ancient Christian Writers Series (Paulist Press, New York) from 1993-2007, and Drew University’s translation editor from 1995-1997 for its new series, Ancient Christian Commentary (IVPress, Downers Grove), he helped to highlight the interaction of Christianity and Judaism in early Church writing. Fr. McManus has written numerous articles on this and other historical topics in The Word Set Free (ADL, 2000); The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian-Jewish Relations (2002) and “The Jewish Background of the Celibacy of Jesus” in The Celibacy of Jesus (St. Botolph Press, 2013).

Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor is the Vice President - Philanthropy at the World Union for Progressive Judaism which serves, nurtures and supports over 1,400 Reform/Progressive/Liberal/Reconstructionist Jewish congregations and over 1.8 million members in 49 countries around the world. He is a recognized expert in Interfaith relations, well-known lecturer, author of numerous articles and editor of two books.

Gary served as the Director of the Education Division at the Anti-Defamation League and as the Director of Interfaith Affairs. He served as Senior Rabbi at Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in NYC for eight years.

He was the Director of Interreligious Affairs at the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now URJ), and the Associate Director of the Commission on Social Action of Reform Judaism. During his tenure there he also served as the Associate Director of the Commission on Jewish Education and the Director of Adult Education.

A graduate of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, from which he also received his Doctor of Divinity degree in 2009, he was on the faculty of the Religion and History Departments of Sarah Lawrence College and was a Lecturer at the New York University School of Continuing Education and a member of the faculty of the HUC-JIR School of Education as Lecturer in Intertestamental Literature and Jewish Ethics. He was appointed as the Khatib Chair of Comparative Religion at St. Joseph’s College in New York for the academic year of 2012. Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor served congregations in Mahopac, New York; San Juan, Puerto Rico; St. Louis, Missouri; and Elizabeth, New Jersey. He served as rabbi at Congregation Da’at Elohim – Temple of Universal Judaism on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, for 5 years and has just been appointed rabbi of Congregation Shirat HaYam in Nantucket, Massachussets. Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor is the editor and principal writer of Shalom / Salaam: A Resource for Jewish / Muslim Dialogue. His most recent book is called A Jewish View of Cults. He is a past chair of the Central Conference of American Rabbis’ Interreligious Affairs Committee; on the Executive Committee of the National Council of Synagogues; served as the Program Chair of the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations; served on the Executive Board of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, and on the Alumni Board of the Sarah Lawrence College. He was the founding Chair of the Interfaith Assembly on Homelessness and Housing, and was a member of the Board of Homes for the Homeless in New York City.

 

Richard Rashke is a lecturer and author of non-fiction books including The Killing of Karen Silkwood and the forthcoming USEFUL ENEMIES: John Demjanjuk and America’s Open Door Policy for Nazi War Criminals. Rashke is featured in the award-winning international television series Nazi Hunters. His works have been translated into eleven languages and have been the subject of movies for screen and television. A produced screenwriter and playwright, his work has appeared on network television and off-Broadway. He is also an alto sax player and composer. His latest composition, Crane Wife, a family musical based on a Japanese folktale, was performed at the Kennedy Center, and a new play, Dear Esther, based on a Sobibor prisoner, will open in 2013. He lives in Washington, D.C.

 

Reverend Manfred Deselaers, PhD, Born in Duesseldorf, Germany, on 19 May 1955, Manfred Deselaers is a Catholic priest from the diocese of Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen).

[Text Box: Photo by Mikołaj Grynberg] After his school-leaving examination in Viersen, 1974, and one semester as a student of law in Bonn he went to Israel for one and a half years with  “Action Reconciliation / Service for Peace”,  where, after language classes in Dovrat Kibutz, he worked most of the time in Jerusalem, in a home for disabled children (Beit Cholim Alyn).  He then studied theology in Tuebingen (1976-1981) and Chicago (1978-1979). In 1983 he was ordained. He served as curate in Moenchengladbach and became a Board member of the Society for Christian-Jewish Cooperation.

In October 1989, with the support of his Bishop Klaus Hemmerle, he went to Poland to help in the endeavours towards German-Polish reconciliation. First, he studied the Polish language at the Catholic University in Lublin. Since 3 October 1990, he has been living in the parish of the “Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary” in the town of Oświęcim (Auschwitz).

In 1991 he received his Master's degree at the “Pontifical Academy of Theology” in Cracow, where he also presented his doctoral dissertation on “God and  Evil in the light of  the biography and statements of Rudolf Hoess, commander of Auschwitz” (Professors conferring the degree: Adam Kubiś, Cracow and Bernhard Casper, Freiburg/Br.). His doctorate was conferred in October 1996.

Sent by his Bishop Heinrich Mussinghoff, Aachen, and in agreement with Cardinal Franciszek Macharski (Cracow) he now dedicates his life to German-Polish Reconciliation and Christian-Jewish Dialogue at the Centre for Dialogue and Prayer in Oświęcim. In 2001 he became a member of the Board and is responsible for the Programme Department. Since its reconstitution in 2008 he has been Vice President of the Cracow Foundation “Centrum Dialogu I Modlitwy” (Centre for Dialogue and Prayer) in Oświęcim.

In 1994 he became a guide in the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

In 1998 he became a Holocaust Educator of the International School of Holocaust Studies, Yad Vashem Jerusalem.

Since 1997 he has lectured on “Theology after Auschwitz” at the Pontifical Academy of Theology in Cracow.

Since 2006 he has been a member of the International Auschwitz Council.

Since 2007 he has given lectures at the National Professional College of Oświęcim.

Abraham H. Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) since 1987, is world-renowned as a leader in the fight against anti-Semitism, bigotry and discrimination. He is the co-author of Viral Hate: Containing Its Spread on the Internet (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and author of Jews & Money: The Story of a Stereotype (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), The Deadliest Lies: The Israel Lobby and the Myth of Jewish Control (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) and Never Again? The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism (HarperSanFrancisco, 2003).

In the forefront of major issues of the day, including the rise of global anti-Semitism, the war on terrorism, church/state issues, religious intolerance and issues relating to the Holocaust, he consistently speaks out against hatred and violence wherever they occur. Mr. Foxman regularly confers with elected officials and community leaders here and abroad.  He has had consultations in Europe, Russia, Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, China, Japan, South Africa and Argentina, and with Palestinian leaders, on problems of ethnic hatred, violence, terrorism and promoting democracy.  He has had multiple audiences with Pope John Paul II, with Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis.  Mr. Foxman is a passionate supporter of the State of Israel and a voice for peace in the Middle East.

A Holocaust survivor, Mr. Foxman was a member of the President’s United States Holocaust Memorial Council, appointed by Presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton. He has been a participant of official Presidential delegations to special events in Europe and Israel.

Born in Poland in 1940, Mr. Foxman was saved from the Holocaust by his Polish Catholic nursemaid who baptized and raised him as a Catholic during the war years. His parents survived the war, but 14 members of his family were lost. He arrived in America in 1950 with his parents. A graduate of the Yeshiva of Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY, Mr. Foxman has a B.A. in political science from the City College of the City University of New York, graduating with honors in history. He holds a J.D. degree from New York University School of Law, and did graduate work in advanced Judaic studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary and in international economics at The New School for Social Research. Mr. Foxman is fluent in several languages. He joined ADL in 1965.

Costel Nastasie is the founder and president of Roma Dignity.

Originally from Romania, he left his country after confronting discrimination and racism at a very young age.

70 years ago, his family was subjected to deportation from their village in Transnistria under the Antonescu regime. The majority of them were not able to return and a large number of families died there from cold and hunger.

Currently, he lives in Brussels as a Belgian citizen. For a number of years, he worked as a Peace Keeper and mediator for the Roma community in Brussels.

With the French organization Yahad-In Unum, he returned to Romania to conduct interviews with Roma who survived the deportation. To this day, their 5 research trips have been completed in Romania and1 in the Republic of Macedonia. These trips have enabled the collection of proof of this little-known genocide.

Since 2013, Costel Nastasie has been the president of the organization, Roma Dignity, the project he envisioned to centralize an archival base and documentation of the persecutions endured by the Roma population during World War II and to teach this history to both young Roma and the public at large.

Thomas R. Kline concentrates his practice in civil litigation, arbitration and alternative dispute resolution involving the following areas: general commercial matters, bankruptcy, intellectual property, insurance, energy, environmental issues and administrative law cases, with a specialization in art and cultural property litigation and advice.

Tom most recently served as the Managing Partner of Andrews Kurth's Washington, DC office and on the firm's Policy Committee. Mr. Kline also received the medal of Cyprus Technical University for protecting the cultural heritage of Cyprus.

Jacques Berlinerblau, PhD, holds separate doctorates in ancient Near Eastern languages and literatures, and Sociology. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Dr. Berlinerblau has published on a wide variety of issues ranging from the composition of the Hebrew Bible, to the sociology of heresy, to modern Jewish intellectuals, to African-American and Jewish-American relations. His articles on these and other subjects have appeared in Biblica, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Semeia, Biblical Interpretation, Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, Hebrew Studies, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and History of Religions.

He has published four books, including: Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibility of American Intellectuals (Rutgers University Press); The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously (Cambridge University Press), and Thumpin’ It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today’s Presidential Politics (Westminster John Knox). His most recent book, How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) was released September 2012.

Irene Weiss was born Iren Fogel on November 21, 1930, in Bótrágy, Czechoslovakia (now Batrad’, Ukraine) to Meyer and Leah Fogel.

Irene married Martin Weiss in 1949, and they moved to northern Virginia in 1953. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in education from American University and taught in the Fairfax County Public School system in Virginia for 13 years. Irene and Martin have three children and four grandchildren, and Irene is a volunteer at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Eric Langenbacher, PhD, is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Senior Honors Program in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics, political culture and political films. He studied in Canada before starting graduate work in the Government Department and Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown in 1996. He was awarded a Fulbright grant in 1999-2000 and held the Ernst Reuter Fellowship at the Free University of Berlin in 1999-2000, the Hopper Memorial Fellowship at Georgetown in 2000-2001, and was selected School of Foreign Service faculty member of the year by the 2009 graduating class. He has been teaching in the Government Department since Fall 2002, and also has taught at George Washington University and in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Dr. Langenbacher’s dissertation, defended with distinction in September 2002, forms the basis of his book manuscript “Memory Regimes and Political Culture in Contemporary Germany” currently under review at several presses. He has also published edited volumes, "Lauching the Grand Coalition: The 2005 Bundestag Election and the Future of German Politics," (with Yossi Shain) "Power and the Past: Collective Memory and International Relations," "Between Left and Right: The 2009 Bundestag Election and the Transformation of the German Party System," and (with Jeffrey Anderson) "From the Bonn to the Berlin Republic: Germany at the Twentieth Anniversary of Unification."

His research interests center on political culture, collective memory, political institutions, public opinion and German and European politics. He has published in German Politics and Society, German Politics, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Politics and Ethics and in several edited volumes. He has also planned and run dozens of short programs on various aspects of U.S. politics and society for visitors from abroad.

The tireless force behind the Szyk renaissance, Irvin Ungar is the foremost scholar and expert on the art of Arthur Szyk. A former pulpit rabbi fluent in Jewish history and tradition, Irvin entered the world of historic Judaica by founding the firm Historicana, where he has served as CEO since 1987.

Irvin’s authority on Szyk’s life and work is internationally recognized. He has curated and consulted for numerous Szyk exhibitions at major institutions worldwide, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the German Historical Museum in Berlin, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, and the Library of Congress.

Irvin is the author of Justice Illuminated: The Art of Arthur Szyk, the co-producer of the documentary film, “Soldier in Art: Arthur Szyk,” and the publisher of the luxury limited edition of The Szyk Haggadah. He also serves as the curator of The Arthur Szyk Society and its traveling exhibition program.

Reverend Patrick Desbois, the president of the Yahad–In Unum Association, has devoted his life to confronting anti-Semitism and furthering Catholic-Jewish understanding.

Since 2001 he has led a truly historic undertaking. Working closely with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum staff and using the Museum’s archives to aid his search, he and his team have crisscrossed the countryside of Eastern Europe in an effort to locate every mass grave and site at which Jews were killed during the Holocaust. To date, they have identified 1,617 execution sites. They are also collecting artifacts and, most significantly, recording video testimonies from eyewitnesses—many of whom are speaking publicly for the first time. These invaluable testimonies will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Father Desbois’ extraordinary work to preserve the memory of Eastern Europe’s former Jewish community and to advance understanding of the crimes committed there during the Holocaust has received international media attention.

Nicholas Dean, a member of the Senior Foreign Service, has been Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues since August 2014. He is responsible for developing and implementing U.S. policy pertaining to the return of Holocaust-era assets to their rightful owners, compensation for wrongs committed during the Holocaust, and Holocaust remembrance.

Previously, Mr. Dean was Senior Director for South Asia at the National Security Council. Prior to the White House, he served as Deputy Chief of Mission in Dhaka and Kathmandu, Deputy Director of the Office of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bhutan Affairs, and as Vice Consul in Lahore.

His other diplomatic assignments have included Deputy Principal Officer in Leipzig, Germany, Political/Economic Officer in East Berlin and Munich, German desk officer, Political-Economic Counselor in Tbilisi, Georgia, Energy Officer in Moscow, Commercial Officer in Sydney, and Career Development Officer in the Department of State. Mr. Dean received a B.A. in History from the University of Virginia and Master of Strategic Studies from the National War College.

Ira Forman is the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. In 1974, Forman graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, where he majored in political science. Forman started his career in 1977 working as a legislative liaison for American Israel Public Affairs Committee. He stayed with AIPAC as Political Director until 1981. After completing his MBA in 1983, he went to work for the National Public Affairs Committee as the New York Office Director, which he continued until 1985. From 1990 to 1993, he served as a fellow at the Center for National Policy where he worked on the volume "Democrats and The American Idea: A Bicentennial Appraisal." He left the Center for National Policy to serve as the Director of Congressional Relations in the Office of Personnel Management of the Clinton Administration. He left the Clinton Administration, and became Executive Director of the National Jewish Democratic Council from January 1996 through June 2010. In September 2011, Forman was named Jewish Outreach Director for President Obama's 2012 Reelection Campaign. In May, 2013, Secretary of State John Kerry appointed Forman as the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.

In January 2013, Lesley Weiss was appointed Chair of the U.S. Commission for the Preservation of America’s Heritage Abroad by President Obama, having been a Member since 2011.

The Commission is charged by law with identifying cemeteries, monuments, and historic buildings in Central and Eastern Europe that are associated with the heritage of U.S. citizens. It also seeks assurances from governments that these cultural properties will be protected and preserved.

In October 2014 Ms. Weiss served as a member of the U.S. Delegation to attend the Opening of POLIN, the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw.
In April 2013, Ms. Weiss was a member of the U.S. Presidential Delegation to Poland for the 70th Anniversary Commemoration of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. She also served as Co-Chair of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe working group for the 2013 Global Forum for Combating Anti-Semitism conference in Jerusalem.

She is a member of the U.S. Delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. Ms. Weiss is also Deputy Director of the National Coalition Supporting Eurasian Jewry. (NCSEJ) She travels frequently to the former Soviet Union, where she coordinates community education and outreach efforts and promotes partnerships between American Jewish communities and communities in the region. She monitors compliance by the governments of the region in the areas of free emigration and religious and cultural rights. She served in 2005 as a Public Advisor to the U.S. Delegation to the OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism and Intolerance in Cordoba, Spain, and in 2007, to the follow-up Conference on Combating Discrimination and Promoting Mutual Respect and Understanding in Bucharest, Romania. In addition, she has represented NCSEJ at other OSCE meetings, including the 2006 Human Dimension Implementation Meeting in Warsaw, the 2010 Conference on Tolerance and Non-Discrimination in Astana, Kazakhstan, and the 2014 Berlin Conference on Anti-Semitism. A daughter of a Holocaust survivor, Ms. Weiss accompanied her mother, Irene Weiss to the 70th commemoration of the liberation of Auschwitz in January 2015 and was with her mother during the trial of former SS Sergeant Oskar Groening in May 2015 in Lueneberg Germany.

James Jerry Clark is an educational and human relations consultant with teaching and administrative experience ranging from fifth grade through graduate school, retiring five years ago from Saint Joseph’s University, where he served as Assistant Professor of Education for over a decade.  Jerry is a specialist in diversity awareness, anti-bullying, Holocaust education, and combating anti-Semitism programs for the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), for whom he gives presentations and conducts workshops and Train-the-Trainer programs both locally and nationally. He has facilitated Echoes and Reflections training programs for the past seven years.

Jerry holds a B.A. with a concentration in the social sciences from Shimer College, earned with Honors and Great Distinction, and an M.A. in political science from the University of Chicago. He has also pursued extensive graduate work in philosophy at the Graduate Faculty for Social Research at New School University. He is listed in Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities, Outstanding Young Men of America, and Who’s Who Among American Teachers.   

Rabbi Aaron Miller joined the WHC clergy team as Assistant Rabbi in July 2011. He officiates at services and life cycle events and provides pastoral care and counseling. He also leads efforts to engage young Jewish professionals through our 2239 and Couples Club auxiliaries and works closely with the Congregation's post-b'nei mitzvah program. Rabbi Miller was ordained at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, simultaneously receiving a master's degree in educational administration in a combined program with Xavier University. As a student, Rabbi Miller was awarded the Schusterman Rabbinic Fellowship for study of the opportunities and challenges of 21st-century Jewish life, and was recognized with the Rabbi Morris H. Youngerman Memorial Prize for the most outstanding sermon. He served as a rabbinic intern at Temple Israel in Dayton, Ohio, in addition to student rabbi positions in Michigan and Indiana. With teaching experience in a variety of Jewish schools and settings, Rabbi Miller was also an adjunct professor and Hillel rabbinic intern at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. He earned a bachelor's degree in Near Eastern and Judaic studies from Brandeis University. He and his wife, business analyst Lauren Miller, enjoy music and outdoor experiences.

Warren Marcus works in the Education Division of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. He focuses on program and resource development for the Division, while still assisting with teacher professional development. For eleven years he presented onsite teacher workshops, develops programs and resources and assists with programs such as law enforcement training and student programming. He was the Director of Teacher Workshops and Conferences and annually organized and presented teacher workshops for up to 500 teachers around the nation. He has directed the Belfer National Conferences for Teachers at the Museum from 1997-2006, and he was the lead instructor for 200 high school teachers at the Conferences in 1995 and 1996. Warren taught middle and high school for seventeen years, also serving in a variety of administrative positions, including two department chair positions. He was a national finalist for social studies teacher of the year in 1992 in The Disney Channel Salutes the American Teacher Awards Program, and in 2001 and 2002, he was a national judge for the program. He is a graduate of Brown University and received a Master’s Degree in Education from Harvard University.

Alon Confino, PhD, grew up in Jerusalem and was educated at Tel Aviv University and UC Berkeley. He is broadly interested in the theory and practice of writing history displayed in particular in the topics of memory, culture, and nationhood. His work has often taken modern German history as a point of departure, yet has consistently cast its net wider. As a historian, he has sought to reach in his work the edges of the historical discipline, those areas of research and theory where the historical method meets ethnography, literature, anthropology, and cultural studies. In his writing over the years, he has sought to craft a narrative weaving together story telling with critical analysis. But in recent years he has been particularly interested in probing into different possibilities of historical narration. He is the author of The Nation As a Local Metaphor: Württemberg, Imperial Germany, and National Memory, 1871-1918 (1997) and Germany As a Culture of Remembrance: Promises and Limits of Writing History (2006). In the last few years he has worked on the Holocaust and the result is Foundational Pasts: The Holocaust As Historical Understanding (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2012) and A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide (Yale UP, 2014). It explores the German sensibilities in the Third Reich that underlie the persecution and extermination of the Jews, making them conceivable and imaginable; the project was awarded a 2011 Guggenheim Fellowship. He is now working on forced migrations in the 1940s in Central and Eastern Europe, India/Pakistan, and Palestine/Israel, focusing on issues of local history, memory, and human rights. His focus is a book project on 1948 in Palestine that crafts two narratives: one is based on the experience of Arabs, Jews, and British based on letters, diaries, and oral history, and the second is placing 1948 within global perspective of decolonization, forced migrations, and partitions. Since 2013 he has also been a professor of history at Ben-Gurion University in Israel, where he teaches the spring semester. He is the recipient, among others, of grants from the Fulbright, Humboldt, and Lady Davis Foundations, the Institute of Advanced Studies at the Hebrew University, the Social Science Research Council, the Israel Academy of Sciences, and the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

 

Moran Stern, PhD (candidate) is an Adjunct Lecturer at the Program for Jewish Civilization in Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a doctoral candidate in Government & Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. At Georgetown's SFS, he instructed courses on the History of Zionism, Jewish Civilization, and Israel. Previously, he taught at American University’s Center for Israel Studies. In addition, he served as a commentator for the Washington Jewish Week where he wrote about Israeli politics, society, security, Judaism, the Middle East, Turkey, and U.S.-Israel relations. His analyses also appeared in venues such as The Atlantic and the Jewish Daily Forward. He is occasionally interviewed by the American and the international media. Mr. Stern is a native of Israel, served in the IDF, speaks Hebrew and (solid) Arabic, and is passionate about all Middle East affairs.

Karski Institute 2014

Reuven Azar is the Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Israel. He previously served as Head of Middle East Research in the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA). From 2010 to 2012, Reuven was the Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Israel in Amman.

Since the completion of the MFA cadet training program in 1994, he held mostly Middle East related positions, such as Head of the Iran Sanctions Team and Director of Middle East Economic Research. During his carrier Reuven covered different aspects of cooperation and negotiations with the Palestinian Authority, as well as research on Palestinian issues. He served four years in Cairo as Head of Economic & Trade Department at the Embassy of Israel. In a previous round in Washington, DC (2003-2006) he served as Counselor for Political Affairs.

Reuven was born in Argentina in 1967 and made Aliyah (immigrated) with his family to Jerusalem, Israel at the age of 13. He served in a Paratroopers battalion of the Israeli Defense Forces from 1985 to 1988 and was a reservist combat Sergeant up to 2008. Reuven has both an MA and BA from the Department of International Relations at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He is married to Rachel and a father to Roni, Ofir and Oren. Reuven speaks fluent Spanish and Arabic, in addition to English and Hebrew.

Jacques Berlinerblau, PhD, holds separate doctorates in ancient Near Eastern languages and literatures, and Sociology. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Dr. Berlinerblau has published on a wide variety of issues ranging from the composition of the Hebrew Bible, to the sociology of heresy, to modern Jewish intellectuals, to African-American and Jewish-American relations. His articles on these and other subjects have appeared in Biblica, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Semeia, Biblical Interpretation, Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, Hebrew Studies, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and History of Religions.

He has published four books, including: Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibility of American Intellectuals (Rutgers University Press); The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously (Cambridge University Press), and Thumpin’ It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today’s Presidential Politics (Westminster John Knox). His most recent book, How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) was released September 2012.

Douglas Davidson is a member of the Senior Foreign Service and became Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues in April 2010. As such, he is responsible for developing and implementing U.S. policy pertaining to the return of Holocaust-era assets to their rightful owners, compensation for wrongs committed during the Holocaust, and Holocaust remembrance. 

From 2004 to 2008 Davidson was Head of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina. This 600-person mission worked to strengthen human rights and rule of law, to return displaced persons and refugees to their pre-war homes and to help build the institutions of democracy.

From 2001 to 2004, Davidson was Deputy U.S. Representative to the OSCE in Vienna. In that capacity he participated in a number of multilateral negotiations, including those that led to the first OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism in 2003.

His other overseas diplomatic assignments have included: Kosovo in the immediate aftermath of its most recent conflict; Zagreb and Belgrade from the end of the war in former Yugoslavia to the eve of the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia; and Peshawar in the early 1980s during the Soviet-Afghan war. From the late 1989 until early 1993 he was an Assistant Press Secretary for Foreign Affairs at the White House.

He has also been a Distinguished Visiting Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. He was most recently Senior State Department Advisor to the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe ("the Helsinki Commission").

Davidson holds a B.A. from Lawrence University and an A.M. from Brown University, both in classics. From 2000 to 2001 he was a member of the Senior Seminar, the State Department's executive leadership and management training program.

Reverend Patrick Desbois, the president of the Yahad–In Unum Association, has devoted his life to confronting anti-Semitism and furthering Catholic-Jewish understanding. Since 2001 he has led a truly historic undertaking. 

Working closely with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum staff and using the Museum’s archives to aid his search, he and his team have crisscrossed the countryside in Ukraine in an effort to locate every mass grave and site at which Jews were killed during the Holocaust. To date, they have identified 800 of an estimated 2,000 such locations. They are also collecting artifacts and, most significantly, recording video testimonies from eyewitnesses—many of whom are speaking publicly for the first time. These invaluable testimonies will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Father Desbois’ extraordinary work to preserve the memory of Ukraine’s former Jewish community and to advance understanding of the crimes committed there during the Holocaust has received international media attention.

Rabbi Gary Bretton-Granatoor is the Vice President - Philanthropy at the World Union for Progressive Judaism which serves, nurtures and supports over 1,400 Reform/Progressive/Liberal/Reconstructionist Jewish congregations and over 1.8 million members in 49 countries around the world. He is a recognized expert in Interfaith relations, well-known lecturer, author of numerous articles and editor of two books.

Gary served as the Director of the Education Division at the Anti-Defamation League and as the Director of Interfaith Affairs. He served as Senior Rabbi at Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in NYC for eight years.

He was the Director of Interreligious Affairs at the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (now URJ), and the Associate Director of the Commission on Social Action of Reform Judaism. During his tenure there he also served as the Associate Director of the Commission on Jewish Education and the Director of Adult Education.

A graduate of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, from which he also received his Doctor of Divinity degree in 2009, he was on the faculty of the Religion and History Departments of Sarah Lawrence College and was a Lecturer at the New York University School of Continuing Education and a member of the faculty of the HUC-JIR School of Education as Lecturer in Intertestamental Literature and Jewish Ethics. He was appointed as the Khatib Chair of Comparative Religion at St. Joseph’s College in New York for the academic year of 2012. Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor served congregations in Mahopac, New York; San Juan, Puerto Rico; St. Louis, Missouri; and Elizabeth, New Jersey. He served as rabbi at Congregation Da’at Elohim – Temple of Universal Judaism on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, for 5 years and has just been appointed rabbi of Congregation Shirat HaYam in Nantucket, Massachussets.

Rabbi Bretton-Granatoor is the editor and principal writer of Shalom / Salaam: A Resource for Jewish / Muslim Dialogue. His most recent book is called A Jewish View of Cults.

He is a past chair of the Central Conference of American Rabbis’ Interreligious Affairs Committee; on the Executive Committee of the National Council of Synagogues; served as the Program Chair of the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations; served on the Executive Board of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, and on the Alumni Board of the Sarah Lawrence College. He was the founding Chair of the Interfaith Assembly on Homelessness and Housing, and was a member of the Board of Homes for the Homeless in New York City.

David C. Friedman is the Anti-Defamation League's Washington, D.C. Regional Director. He also serves as the director of ADL’s work with law enforcement throughout the country.

David has helped create a number of national programs and initiatives. These include: The District of Columbia Bias Crimes Task Force, a coalition of law enforcement and community organizations co-founded with then U.S. Attorney Eric H. Holder, Jr; Law Enforcement and Society, a partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which has trained more than 75,000 law enforcement professionals and is a required part of training for all FBI New Agents; ADL’s Advanced Training School, a counter-terrorism program that has trained more than 750 federal, state and local police commanders throughout the nation; ADL’s National Counter-Terrorism Seminar, a program which takes  American law enforcement leaders to Israel to study counter-terrorism strategies and tactics; Bearing Witness, a joint program of ADL, the Archdiocese of Washington, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the National Catholic Educational Association; and ADL In Concert Against Hate, an annual event at the Kennedy Center honoring heroes in the fight against hatred, injustice, extremism and terrorism.   

David joined ADL in 1985 as an Assistant Regional Director in the Washington, D.C. Regional Office. In 1986 he was appointed to serve as the first director of the ADL’s Northern Ohio Regional Office. He returned to Washington, D.C. in 1988 to assume his current position. In 2001 he was asked to assume responsibility for overseeing the ADL’s national initiatives with law enforcement. David is a recipient of the Milton A. Senn Award for Professional Excellence, ADL’s highest staff award. 

Born and raised in New York City, David has a BA from Brandeis University and two Masters from Columbia University.

Ira Forman is the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. In 1974, Forman graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, where he majored in political science. Forman started his career in 1977 working as a legislative liaison for American Israel Public Affairs Committee. He stayed with AIPAC as Political Director until 1981. After completing his MBA in 1983, he went to work for the National Public Affairs Committee as the New York Office Director, which he continued until 1985. From 1990 to 1993, he served as a fellow at the Center for National Policy where he worked on the volume "Democrats and The American Idea: A Bicentennial Appraisal." He left the Center for National Policy to serve as the Director of Congressional Relations in the Office of Personnel Management of the Clinton Administration. He left the Clinton Administration, and became Executive Director of the National Jewish Democratic Council from January 1996 through June 2010. In September 2011, Forman was named Jewish Outreach Director for President Obama's 2012 Reelection Campaign. In May, 2013, Secretary of State John Kerry appointed Forman as the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.

Thoms R. Kline concentrates his practice in civil litigation, arbitration and alternative dispute resolution involving the following areas: general commercial matters, bankruptcy, intellectual property, insurance, energy, environmental issues and administrative law cases, with a specialization in art and cultural property litigation and advice.

Tom most recently served as the Managing Partner of Andrews Kurth's Washington, DC office and on the firm's Policy Committee. Mr. Kline also received the medal of Cyprus Technical University for protecting the cultural heritage of Cyprus.

Eric Langenbacher, PhD, is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Senior Honors Program in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics, political culture and political films. He studied in Canada before starting graduate work in the Government Department and Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown in 1996. He was awarded a Fulbright grant in 1999-2000 and held the Ernst Reuter Fellowship at the Free University of Berlin in 1999-2000, the Hopper Memorial Fellowship at Georgetown in 2000-2001, and was selected School of Foreign Service faculty member of the year by the 2009 graduating class. He has been teaching in the Government Department since Fall 2002, and also has taught at George Washington University and in Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Dr. Langenbacher’s dissertation, defended with distinction in September 2002, forms the basis of his book manuscript “Memory Regimes and Political Culture in Contemporary Germany” currently under review at several presses. He has also published edited volumes, "Lauching the Grand Coalition: The 2005 Bundestag Election and the Future of German Politics," (with Yossi Shain) "Power and the Past: Collective Memory and International Relations," "Between Left and Right: The 2009 Bundestag Election and the Transformation of the German Party System," and (with Jeffrey Anderson) "From the Bonn to the Berlin Republic: Germany at the Twentieth Anniversary of Unification."

His research interests center on political culture, collective memory, political institutions, public opinion and German and European politics. He has published in German Politics and Society, German Politics, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Politics and Ethics and in several edited volumes. He has also planned and run dozens of short programs on various aspects of U.S. politics and society for visitors from abroad.

Deborah E. Lipstadt, PhD, is the Dorot Associate Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. Her latest book, published in 2011, The Eichmann Trial, commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Eichmann trial.

Professor Lipstadt has written many critically acclaimed books on the Holocaust and Holocaust denial. Her book Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory (Penguin Group USA, Incorporated) was the first full-length study of those who attempt to deny the Holocaust. The book has met with wide acclaim, and was declared by The New York Times to be one of the notable books of 1993.  This led to the events that would be the subject of her 2006 book History on Trial: My Day in Court with a Holocaust Denier (HarperCollins Publishers), the story of her libel trial in London against David Irving who sued her for calling him a Holocaust denier and right wing extremist. The book won the 2006 National Jewish Book Award and was first runner up for the Koret Award. Dr. Lipstadt has also written Beyond Belief: The American Press and the Coming of the Holocaust.

Dr. Lipstadt has taught at the University of California at Los Angeles and Occidental College, as well as at the University of Washington at Seattle. At Emory she created the Institute for Jewish Studies and was its first director from 1998-2008. Dr. Lipstadt has also participated in the Konrad Adenauer Foundation’s Jewish-German exchange program, and has visited Germany at that government’s request to consult on methods of teaching Jewish history and the Holocaust, particularly in former East Germany. In 2009 she was in residence at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum as the Burton Resnick Invitational Scholar in Antisemitism

She has contributed to and has been quoted in a variety of newspapers and magazines, and has appeared on CNN, Sixty Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, National Public Radio’s Fresh Air, and The Charlie Rose Show. Because she refuses to debate Holocaust deniers, she has declined appearances on a number of national television programs.

James Loeffler is Dean's Visiting Scholar on the Andrew Mellon Foundation New Foundations Fellowship at the Georgetown University Law Center. He is on leave from the University of Virginia, where he is Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies. At UVA, he created the first undergraduate course on the History of Human Rights. A specialist in modern European and Jewish history, he is currently at work on a book entitled, The Vanishing Minority: Human Rights as Jewish Politics, 1919-1989 and an edited volume, The Law of Strangers: Critical Perspectives in Jewish Lawyering and International Legal Thought.

Reverend Dennis McManus, D.Litt. has taught at Georgetown University since 1997. He holds a master’s degree in historical ethics from Georgetown University and a doctorate from Drew University in historical theology. At present, he is on the faculty of the Program for Jewish Civilization in the School of Foreign Service, where he offers courses in the history of Christian-Jewish conflict, autobiography in the Holocaust, and the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue.

Father McManus has served for the last four years as Consultant for Jewish Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), where he staffs the two official dialogues between the Jewish community and the Catholic Church in the United States. He also belongs to the Church Relations Committee of the United States Memorial Holocaust Museum and from 1999-2008 was a member of the editorial board of The Stimulus Foundation of New York that publishes works devoted to Catholic-Jewish history and relations. From 2009- 2011, he was the personal delegate of the Archbishop of New York to the Jewish community of New York City. Since 1997, Fr. McManus has membered on the board of directors of the Anti-Defamation League/USCCB joint program in Holocaust education known as Bearing Witness, offered nationally in Catholic dioceses. He is also director of the newly founded Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education at Georgetown University, which sponsors a weeklong, intensive program in Holocaust education for high school teachers from across the U.S. Additionally, he teaches annually in the Holocaust education workshop at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City.

Fr. McManus’ research interests lie in two fields: first, the relationship of Jews with early Christians and second, the meaning of Judaism in Roman Catholic liturgy. As general editor of The Ancient Christian Writers Series (Paulist Press, New York) from 1993-2007, and Drew University’s translation editor from 1995-1997 for its new series, Ancient Christian Commentary (IVPress, Downers Grove), he helped to highlight the interaction of Christianity and Judaism in early Church writing. Fr. McManus has written numerous articles on this and other historical topics in The Word Set Free (ADL, 2000); The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian-Jewish Relations (2002) and “The Jewish Background of the Celibacy of Jesus” in The Celibacy of Jesus (St. Botolph Press, 2013).

Margaret Paxson, PhD, is an anthropologist and author of Solvyovo: The Story of Memory in a Russian Village, which was named a 2006 “Book of the Year” by Salon.com. A Research Fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University, Dr. Paxson studies the problem of social memory and the transformation of societies in times of war and peace. She has conducted long-term fieldwork projects in the Russian north, the North Caucasus, and rural France. Her essays have appeared in The Washington Post, The Washington Post Magazine, Aeon, The Wilson Quarterly, and Die Zeit, as well as in scholarly books and journals. She has held research appointments at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and George Washington University. A native of Rochester, New York, Dr. Paxson has had a lifelong interest in community- and peace-building and was a coordinator for Rochester’s Biracial Partnerships, an innovative program that sought to build lasting bridges between the city’s racial communities. She is fluent in Russian and French and also has skills in Kabardian, a language of Russia’s North Caucasus region, and has appeared on BBC Radio, Dialog television, and other broadcast media. Dr. Paxson holds a B.A. in anthropology from McGill University and a master’s and Ph.D., also in anthropology, from the University of Montreal. She is currently writing a memoir about her journeys to the region of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, France, where a remarkable rescue effort was undertaken during the Holocaust. 

Eli Rosenbaum is the Director of Human Rights Enforcement Strategy and Policy at the U.S. Department of Justice. He is the longest-serving prosecutor and investigator of Nazi criminals in history, having worked on these cases at the Department of Justice for more than 20 years. A graduate of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and of the Harvard Law School, he has served since 1994 as Director of the Justice Department’s Office of Special Investigations (OSI), which investigates and prosecutes WWII-era Nazi criminals. Under Mr. Rosenbaum’s leadership, OSI has won major awards from the Anti-Defamation League and Holocaust survivor groups, and it has been called “the most successful government Nazi-hunting organization on earth” (ABC News, 3/25/95). Rosenbaum’s published works include Betrayal: The Untold Story of the Kurt Waldheim Investigation and Cover-Up (St. Martin’s Press), which was selected for “Notable Books of 1993” by the New York Times Book Review and “Best Books of 1993” by The San Francisco Chronicle.

Irene Weiss was born Iren Fogel on November 21, 1930, in Bótrágy, Czechoslovakia (now Batrad’, Ukraine) to Meyer and Leah Fogel. Meyer owned a lumber yard, and Leah managed their home and cared for Irene and her five siblings—Moshe, Edit, Reuven, Gershon, and Serena. When Nazi Germany dismembered Czechoslovakia in 1939, Bótrágy came under Hungarian rule and Hungarian Authorities intensified their persecution of Jews. Hungarian authorities banned Jews from attending school, confiscated Jewish businesses, and required thousands of Jewish men to be inducted into Hungarian forced labor brigades under military command. In April 1944 Hungarian authorities rounded up tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews, including the Fogels, and crowded them into a ghetto in Munkács, a brick factory that was never intended to house people, where hundreds of families were forced to live in inhumane conditions. Shortly after their arrival, all girls under the age of 16 were forced to have their heads shaved. Irene’s mother gave her a scarf to wear around her baldhead, which made Irene look older and probably helped save her life during a future selection at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Irene and her family were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau over a two-month period beginning in May 1944. Nearly 425,000 Jews were deported from Hungary to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Irene was 13 years old. Upon arrival at the camp, her mother, three younger siblings, and older brother were killed. SS authorities selected Irene and her sister Serena for forced labor, while their father was forced to work as a Sonderkommando, removing corpses from the gas chambers and cremating them. While still in the camp, Irene’s aunt learned through a boy from their hometown that when Meyer could no longer perform this work, the SS shot and killed him.

When the SS evacuated them to Ravensbrück, Irene, Serena, and two maternal aunts, Rose and Piri Mermelstein, worked in the “Canada” section of Birkenau—storage warehouses located near two crematoria –for eight months. On January 1945 the SS forcibly evacuated them on foot to the Ravensbrück concentration camp in central Germany. Three weeks later, the SS transported them to Neustadt-Glewe, a subcamp of Ravensbrück, east of Hamburg. There, Piri became ill and was killed. One day during morning roll call, the SS separated Serena and other prisoners from the group, deeming them too weak and emaciated to work. Irene said to a camp guard, “She is my sister,” and was then allowed to go with Serena. The sisters heard from other inmates that they would be sent back to Ravensbrück, where there were gas chambers. They were locked in a room with other prisoners to await the transport truck, but it never arrived. As Soviet troops approached, the SS personnel fled, leaving the camp unguarded, and the prisoners gradually left. Irene, Serena, and Rose found temporary shelter in an empty house in a nearby town. Soon after, the three women made their way to Prague to look for relatives or other survivors. After the War they found an uncle, Joseph Mermelstein, who in 1938 had immigrated from his hometown to Palestine and returned as a soldier in the Czech Legion of the British Army. A few aunts and uncles survived, but Irene and Serena were the only surviving children from the family. Irene, Serena, and Rose lived together with their surviving relatives in Teplice-Šanov in the Sudetenland. Irene attended a Czech school, Serena worked in a factory, and Rose remained at home, ill with tuberculosis. With the sponsorship of relatives and financial aid from the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Irene, Serena, and Rose immigrated to New York in 1947. Irene married Martin Weiss in 1949, and they moved to northern Virginia in 1953. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in education from American University and taught in the Fairfax County Public School system in Virginia for 13 years. Irene and Martin have three children and four grandchildren, and Irene is a volunteer at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Mark Weitzman is Director of Government Affairs and the Director of the Task Force against Hate and Terrorism for the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He is also the Chief Representative of the Center to the United Nations in New York, and was the Founding Director of the SWC’s Museum of Tolerance, New York. Mr. Weitzman is a member of the official US delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Authority (formerly the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research) where he chairs the Committee on Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial, is a member of the advisory panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion or Belief of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and co-chairs the Working Group on International Affairs of the Global Forum on Antisemitism. Currently Mr. Weitzman is also a participant in the program on Religion and Foreign Policy of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a board member and former Vice-President of the Association of Holocaust Organizations and was member of the advisory board of the Institute for the Study of Global Antisemitism and Policy at Yale University, and also was a longtime member of the official Jewish-Catholic Dialogue Group of New York.

Mr. Weitzman is a winner of the 2007 National Jewish Book Award for best anthology for Antisemitism, the Generic Hatred: Essays in Memory of Simon Wiesenthal which he co-edited and contributed to and which has appeared in French, Spanish and Russian editions. Forthcoming this winter from the Vidal Sassoon Center for the Study of Antisemitism at the Hebrew University is Jews and Judaism in the Political Theology of Radical Catholic Traditionalists. Recent publications include the chapters Magical Logic: Globalization, Conspiracy Theory and the Shoah, which appeared in the 2012 volume Holocaust Denial: the Politics of Perfidy, edited by Robert Wistrich (an earlier version was published by the Vidal Sassoon Center for the Study of Antisemitism at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 2009) and Antisemitism and Terrorism on the Electronic Highway which appeared in the book Terrorism and the Internet: Threats — Target Groups — Deradicalisation Strategies (IOS Press for NATO, 2010). Mr. Weitzman also co-edited Strategies in Facing Antisemitism: An Educational Resource Guide, a joint publication of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Yad Vashem which was published in 2009. A frequent commentator on issues related to antisemitism, extremism and tolerance, Mr. Weitzman has appeared on television shows such as Charlie Rose, Rachel Maddow, Keith Olbermann, The McLaughlin Report and the History Channel,  as well as in newspapers  (The New York Times, Washington Post,  Jerusalem Post, Times of Israel, The Jewish Week and The Forward).

He has lectured and worked with various groups including Congress, the U.N., the EU (European Union) the U.S. Army and the FBI. In 2004 he was one of the featured speakers at the UN’s first ever conference on antisemitism and in 2009 addressed the UN’s conference on cyber hate. In June 2005 he spoke at the OSCE conference on Antisemitism and Other Forms of Intolerance which was held in Cordoba, Spain, and he was an advisor to the US delegation at the June 2007 Bucharest OSCE conference on Combating Discrimination. Mr. Weitzman also chaired the panels on Internet and Media Issues at the 2007 and 2008 Global Forums on Antisemitism that were convened by the Israeli government. In April of 2008 he was one of the Jewish leaders invited to meet with Pope Benedict XVI during his visit to the US, and in 1999 Mr. Weitzman was honored with the Distinguished Service Award by the Center of Hate and Extremism at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

Dismantling the Big Lie: the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, which he co-authored with Steven L. Jacobs, the first full refutation of the infamous Protocols, was published in 2003 and has been translated into Arabic and Japanese.  His chapter, Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung : permanente Elemente des globalen Rechtsextremismus - Antisemitism (Antisemitismand Holocaust Denial: Permanent Elements of Global Right-wing Extremism) was published in the volume Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus?: Die extremische Rechte in der Ara der Globalisierung (Globalized Right-wing Extremism: Right-wing Extremism in an Era of Globalization - 2006) and the chapter The Transmigration of Antisemitism: Old Myths; New Realities, appeared in the volume Not Your Father’s Antisemitism: the Hatred of Jews in the Early 21st Century, (2008). He also was a contributor to the Encyclopedia of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity (2004).  Other publications include editing and contributing to Dignity and Defiance: Confronting Life and Death in the Warsaw Ghetto (1993) The New Lexicon of Hate (3rd edition, 2004)   the textbook The Holocaust: Historical Case Studies (1996) and the Wiesenthal Center’s annual electronic report, Digital Hate and Terrorism (2000-2013). In 1987 he was on the board of advisors for the companion guide for the film Shoah.

Elizabeth “Barry” White was appointed research director of the Center for the Prevention of Genocide in September 2012. Prior to that, she worked for nearly 30 years at the US Department of Justice, serving as chief historian and deputy director of the Office of Special Investigations and, most recently, as deputy chief and chief historian of the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section. In both positions, she directed research for civil and criminal cases against the perpetrators of genocide, war crimes, Nazi persecution, and other human rights violations. She also contributed to interagency efforts to deny safe haven to human rights violators in the United States and to develop effective strategies for preventing and responding to genocide and mass atrocity. She has a PhD in history from the University of Virginia and is the author of German Influence in the Argentine Army, 1900–1945 and numerous articles and papers.

Zhiqing Zhong is a Research Professor at the Institute of Foreign Literature, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. She holds a M.A. from the Department of Chinese at Beijing Normal University and a Ph.D. from the Department of Hebrew Literature at Ben-Gurion University. Her doctoral dissertation is 'A Comparative Study of Hebrew and Chinese Literature in Response to the Catastrophe of World War Two'. Recently she has accomplished a project '20th Century's Hebrew Literature in Transition' sponsored by China's National Social Science Foundation. Her current research interests focus on contemporary Hebrew and Chinese writings on their war memories in the context of building a new nation.

Karski Institute 2013

Victoria Barnett, PhD, is the Staff Director for the Committee on Church Relations and the Holocaust at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Dr. Barnett has helped create academic and public programs, panels, and symposia on Christianity and the Holocaust with institutions around the country. Her publications include Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust (Praeger Publishers) and For the Soul of the People: Protestant Protest against Hitler (Oxford University Press). She is also a prominent Bonhoeffer scholar and one of the general editors of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English Edition.

Jacques Berlinerblau, PhD, holds separate doctorates in ancient Near Eastern languages and literatures, and Sociology. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Dr. Berlinerblau has published on a wide variety of issues ranging from the composition of the Hebrew Bible, to the sociology of heresy, to modern Jewish intellectuals, to African-American and Jewish-American relations. His articles on these and other subjects have appeared in Biblica, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Semeia, Biblical Interpretation, Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, Hebrew Studies, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and History of Religions.

He has published four books, including: Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibility of American Intellectuals (Rutgers University Press); The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously (Cambridge University Press), and Thumpin’ It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today’s Presidential Politics (Westminster John Knox). His most recent book, How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) was released September 2012.

Ambassador Barukh Binah assumed his duties as the Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Israel in Washington, DC in 2012. From 2008 to January, 2012 he served as the Deputy Director General for North America at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem. He previously served as Israel's Consul General to the Midwest, based in Chicago (2005-2008).

A member of Israel’s foreign service since 1979, he has held various positions in diplomacy, research, policy planning, and media relations. In 1985, he was appointed Israel’s Spokesman and Press Officer in New York. In 1992, he was assigned to Washington, D.C. as Counselor for Congressional Affairs at the Embassy of Israel. He later became the Embassy’s Minister-Counselor for Public Affairs.

Ambassador Binah's assignments in Jerusalem included: Director of the Press Division and Spokesman of the Foreign Ministry; Director of Consulates and of Congressional Affairs; and Head of the International Affairs Bureau in the Center for Political Research and Controller of Research Quality. He also served as an analyst and a research officer in the Israel Defense Force.

Barukh Binah holds degrees, with honors, in history, Middle Eastern studies, political science and strategic studies from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Haifa University and Israel's National Defense College. He had served as the Secretary of the Israel Oriental Society and contributed to literary periodicals.

Douglas Davidson is a member of the Senior Foreign Service and became Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues in April 2010. As such, he is responsible for developing and implementing U.S. policy pertaining to the return of Holocaust-era assets to their rightful owners, compensation for wrongs committed during the Holocaust, and Holocaust remembrance. 

From 2004 to 2008 Davidson was Head of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina. This 600-person mission worked to strengthen human rights and rule of law, to return displaced persons and refugees to their pre-war homes and to help build the institutions of democracy.

From 2001 to 2004, Davidson was Deputy U.S. Representative to the OSCE in Vienna. In that capacity he participated in a number of multilateral negotiations, including those that led to the first OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism in 2003.

His other overseas diplomatic assignments have included: Kosovo in the immediate aftermath of its most recent conflict; Zagreb and Belgrade from the end of the war in former Yugoslavia to the eve of the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia; and Peshawar in the early 1980s during the Soviet-Afghan war. From the late 1989 until early 1993 he was an Assistant Press Secretary for Foreign Affairs at the White House.

He has also been a Distinguished Visiting Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. He was most recently Senior State Department Advisor to the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe ("the Helsinki Commission").

Davidson holds a B.A. from Lawrence University and an A.M. from Brown University, both in classics. From 2000 to 2001 he was a member of the Senior Seminar, the State Department's executive leadership and management training program.

Reverend Patrick Desbois, the president of the Yahad–In Unum Association, has devoted his life to confronting anti-Semitism and furthering Catholic-Jewish understanding. Since 2001 he has led a truly historic undertaking. 

Working closely with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum staff and using the Museum’s archives to aid his search, he and his team have crisscrossed the countryside in Ukraine in an effort to locate every mass grave and site at which Jews were killed during the Holocaust. To date, they have identified 800 of an estimated 2,000 such locations. They are also collecting artifacts and, most significantly, recording video testimonies from eyewitnesses—many of whom are speaking publicly for the first time. These invaluable testimonies will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Father Desbois’ extraordinary work to preserve the memory of Ukraine’s former Jewish community and to advance understanding of the crimes committed there during the Holocaust has received international media attention.

Rabbi Elliot N. Dorff, PhD, is a Conservative rabbi. He is the Sol and Anne Dorff Distinguished Service Professor in Philosophy at the American Jewish University (formerly the University of Judaism) in California, Rector, author and bio-ethicist. For more than thirty years as a Visiting Professor, he has taught a course on Jewish law at UCLA School of Law. Dorff is an expert in the philosophy of Conservative Judaism, bioethics and is acknowledged within the Conservative community as an expert devisor of Jewish law. 

Rabbi Dorff was ordained as a rabbi from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1970. He earned a PhD in philosophy from Columbia University in 1971. Dorff is the chairman of the Rabbinical Assembly's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards, and has written many responsa (opinion papers and legal rulings) on various aspects of Jewish law and philosophy. Rabbi Dorff was awarded the Journal of Law and Religion’s Lifetime Achievement Award and holds three honorary doctoral degrees. Rabbi Dorff is Chair of the Conservative Movement's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards and served on the editorial committee of Etz Hayim, the new Torah commentary for the Conservative Movement. He has chaired three scholarly organizations: the Academy of Jewish Philosophy, the Jewish Law Association, and the Society of Jewish Ethics. He is also immediate past President of the Academy of Judaic, Christian, and Islamic Studies. In the spring of 1993, he served on the Ethics Committee of Hillary Clinton's Health Care Task Force.

In March 1997 and May 1999, he testified on behalf of the Jewish tradition on the subjects of human cloning and stem cell research before the President's National Bioethics Advisory Commission. In 1999 and 2000 he was part of the Surgeon General’s commission to draft a Call to Action for Responsible Sexual Behavior; and from 2000 to 2002 he served on the National Human Resources Protections Advisory Commission, charged with reviewing and revising the federal guidelines for protecting human subjects in research projects. Rabbi Dorff is also a member of an advisory committee for the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History on the social, ethical, and religious implications of their exhibits.

David C. Friedman is the Anti-Defamation League's Washington, D.C. Regional Director. He also serves as the director of ADL’s work with law enforcement throughout the country.

David has helped create a number of national programs and initiatives. These include: The District of Columbia Bias Crimes Task Force, a coalition of law enforcement and community organizations co-founded with then U.S. Attorney Eric H. Holder, Jr; Law Enforcement and Society, a partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which has trained more than 75,000 law enforcement professionals and is a required part of training for all FBI New Agents;  ADL’s Advanced Training School, a counter-terrorism program that has trained more than 750 federal, state and local police commanders throughout the nation; ADL’s National Counter-Terrorism Seminar, a program which takes  American law enforcement leaders to Israel to study counter-terrorism strategies and tactics; Bearing Witness, a joint program of ADL, the Archdiocese of Washington, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the National Catholic Educational Association; and ADL In Concert Against Hate, an annual event at the Kennedy Center honoring heroes in the fight against hatred, injustice, extremism and terrorism.   

David joined ADL in 1985 as an Assistant Regional Director in the Washington, D.C. Regional Office. In 1986 he was appointed to serve as the first director of the ADL’s Northern Ohio Regional Office. He returned to Washington, D.C. in 1988 to assume his current position. In 2001 he was asked to assume responsibility for overseeing the ADL’s national initiatives with law enforcement. David is a recipient of the Milton A. Senn Award for Professional Excellence, ADL’s highest staff award. 

Born and raised in New York City, David has a BA from Brandeis University and two Masters from Columbia University. David and his wife, Patti, an educator, have been married for thirty-six years. Patti and David have two children, Sylvie, 28, a marketing director for a start-up company in Washington, DC, and Jack, 25, a chef in San Francisco.

Ira Forman is the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. In 1974, Forman graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, where he majored in political science. Forman started his career in 1977 working as a legislative liaison for American Israel Public Affairs Committee. He stayed with AIPAC as Political Director until 1981. After completing his MBA in 1983, he went to work for the National Public Affairs Committee as the New York Office Director, which he continued until 1985. From 1990 to 1993, he served as a fellow at the Center for National Policy where he worked on the volume "Democrats and The American Idea: A Bicentennial Appraisal." He left the Center for National Policy to serve as the Director of Congressional Relations in the Office of Personnel Management of the Clinton Administration. He left the Clinton Administration, and became Executive Director of the National Jewish Democratic Council from January 1996 through June 2010. In September 2011, Forman was named Jewish Outreach Director for President Obama's 2012 Reelection Campaign. In May, 2013, Secretary of State John Kerry appointed Forman as the US Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.

Joshua Kretman is an Attorney-Adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser, Office of International Claims and Investment Disputes, Department of State, where he advises on issues related to Holocaust claims. Prior to working in the Office of the Legal Adviser, Joshua clerked for the Honorable Janet Bond Arterton in the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut. Joshua graduated from Stanford Law School.

Brian Kritz is a Research Fellow in the MA Program in Conflict Resolution at Georgetown University, where he also teaches in the MA Program in Conflict Resolution and the Department of Government.  He was previously a Senior Fellow in the Institute for International Law, Technology, and Global Security at Georgetown University. He is a former Democracy Fellow and Senior Human Rights and Rule of Law Advisor at USAID, a pro bono legal advisor to the Prosecutor General’s Office for the Republic of Rwanda, and criminal prosecutor in California. His recent publications include articles on the intentional spread of HIV/AIDS and the International Criminal Court, justice and reconciliation in Darfur, and international legal protections for women and female children in Rwanda.  

Eric Langenbacher, PhD, is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Senior Honors Program in the Department of Government at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics, political culture and political films. He studied in Canada before starting graduate work in the Government Department and Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown in 1996. He was awarded a Fulbright grant in 1999-2000 and held the Ernst Reuter Fellowship at the Free University of Berlin in 1999-2000, the Hopper Memorial Fellowship at Georgetown in 2000-2001, and was selected School of Foreign Service faculty member of the year by the 2009 graduating class. He has been teaching in the Government Department since Fall 2002, and also has taught at George Washington University and in Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

Dr. Langenbacher’s dissertation, defended with distinction in September 2002, forms the basis of his book manuscript “Memory Regimes and Political Culture in Contemporary Germany” currently under review at several presses. He has also published edited volumes, "Lauching the Grand Coalition: The 2005 Bundestag Election and the Future of German Politics," (with Yossi Shain) "Power and the Past: Collective Memory and International Relations," "Between Left and Right: The 2009 Bundestag Election and the Transformation of the German Party System," and (with Jeffrey Anderson) "From the Bonn to the Berlin Republic: Germany at the Twentieth Anniversary of Unification."

His research interests center on political culture, collective memory, political institutions, public opinion and German and European politics. He has published in German Politics and Society, German Politics, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Politics and Ethics and in several edited volumes. He has also planned and run dozens of short programs on various aspects of U.S. politics and society for visitors from abroad.

Annette Lantos is the Chairman of the Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice. Annette, the wife of the late Congressman Tom Lantos, worked full-time in her husband’s office throughout his nearly three decades in the U.S. House of Representatives. She served as the unpaid Executive Director of the Congressional Human Rights Caucus, which Congressman Lantos co-founded. She has spearheaded numerous efforts to help human rights victims, including those persecuted for religious and political reasons, and to further human rights causes. She has also been instrumental in fighting for animal rights and assisted her husband in co-founding the Congressional Friends of Animals Caucus. Annette is the distinguished founder of the International Free Wallenberg Committee, established in 1977 to raise awareness of Raoul Wallenberg’s incredible humanitarian mission in Hungary during the Second World War. Her efforts to locate and free Wallenberg from the Soviet Union resulted in several interviews on national news programs such as CBS’s 60 Minutes. She also spoke directly with President Jimmy Carter about Wallenberg’s case. Although the Swedish humanitarian was never found, Annette and Congressman Lantos have been instrumental in honoring his legacy through numerous legislative initiatives.

Born in Budapest, Hungary, Annette came to the United States at age 16. After graduating from an American high school, Annette went on to obtain her bachelor’s degree and teaching certificate from San Francisco State University. She and Tom were married for nearly 58 years. Annette has two daughters, Annette Jr. and Katrina, eighteen grandchildren, and an ever-increasing number of great-grandchildren.

Katrina Lantos Swett, PhD, established the Lantos Foundation for Human Rights and Justice in 2008 and serves as its President and Chief Executive Officer. This human rights organization proudly carries on the unique legacy of the late Congressman Tom Lantos who, as the only survivor of the Holocaust ever elected to Congress, was one of our nations’ most eloquent and forceful leaders on behalf of human rights and justice. In addition to managing the Lantos Foundation, Dr. Lantos Swett teaches human rights and American foreign policy at Tufts University. She also taught at the University of Southern Denmark while her husband, former Congressman Richard Swett, was serving as the U.S. Ambassador in Copenhagen.

Robert J. Lieber, PhD, is Professor of Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University, where he has previously served as Chair of the Government Department and Interim Chair of Psychology. He is an authority on American foreign policy and U.S. relations with the Middle East and Europe. He was born and raised in Chicago, received his undergraduate education at the University of Wisconsin and his PhD at Harvard. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has also taught at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California, Davis, and has been Visiting Fellow at the Atlantic Institute in Paris, the Brookings Institution in Washington, and Fudan University in Shanghai.

Dr. Lieber’s latest book, Power and Willpower in The American Future: Why the US is Not Destined to Decline, was published Spring 2012 by Cambridge University Press. Prior to this was The American Era: Power and Strategy for the 21st Century (Cambridge University Press). As one reviewer has described it, “This may be the best book on American foreign policy written since September 11.” In addition, Professor Lieber is author or editor of fourteen other books on international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and energy security. 

Professor Lieber has lectured widely in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In the policy realm, he has been a foreign policy adviser in several presidential campaigns and consultant to the State Department and for National Intelligence Estimates. His articles and op-eds have appeared in scholarly journals, magazines and newspapers, including International Security, Foreign Policy, American Political Science Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The National Interest, Commentary, Internationale Politik (Berlin), Politique Etrangere (Paris), International Affairs (London), Harper’s, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Ha’aretz (Tel Aviv), and Asharq Al-Awsat (London), among others, and his media appearances have included The News Hour with Jim Lehrer on PBS TV, ABC TV's Good Morning America and Nightline, NBC and CBS network news, the O'Reilly Factor on Fox TV, Voice of America, BBC World Service, Al Jazeera, and other radio and TV programs in Europe, the Arab world and Israel. Among his assorted credits is a walk-on part in the Alfred Hitchcock film classic, NORTH BY NORTHWEST. 

Deborah E. Lipstadt, PhD, is the Dorot Associate Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. Her latest book, published in 2011, The Eichmann Trial, commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Eichmann trial.

Professor Lipstadt has written many critically acclaimed books on the holocaust and holocaust denial. Her book Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory (Penguin Group USA, Incorporated) was the first full-length study of those who attempt to deny the Holocaust. The book has met with wide acclaim, and was declared by The New York Times to be one of the notable books of 1993.  This led to the events that would be the subject of her 2006 book History on Trial: My Day in Court with a Holocaust Denier (HarperCollins Publishers), the story of her libel trial in London against David Irving who sued her for calling him a Holocaust denier and right wing extremist. The book won the 2006 National Jewish Book Award and was first runner up for the Koret Award. Dr. Lipstadt has also written Beyond Belief: The American Press and the Coming of the Holocaust.

Dr. Lipstadt has taught at the University of California at Los Angeles and Occidental College, as well as at the University of Washington at Seattle. At Emory she created the Institute for Jewish Studies and was its first director from 1998-2008. Dr. Lipstadt has also participated in the Konrad Adenauer Foundation’s Jewish-German exchange program, and has visited Germany at that government’s request to consult on methods of teaching Jewish history and the Holocaust, particularly in former East Germany. In 2009 she was in residence at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum as the Burton Resnick Invitational Scholar in Antisemitism

She has contributed to and has been quoted in a variety of newspapers and magazines, and has appeared on CNN, Sixty Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, National Public Radio’s Fresh Air, and The Charlie Rose Show. Because she refuses to debate Holocaust deniers, she has declined appearances on a number of national television programs.

Steven Luckert is Curator of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s highly acclaimed permanent exhibition, The Holocaust. In this capacity, he serves as the director of the exhibition, which encompasses three floors of the Museum’s building, displays thousands of individual artifacts, and features more than 70 audio-visual components. As part of his tasks, he selects artifacts, writes text, and handles public and media inquiries concerning the exhibition. In addition, Dr. Luckert has curated or co-curated seven special exhibitions at the Museum: Father Jacques (1997), Kristallnacht: the November 1938 Pogroms (1998), The Voyage of the St. Louis (1999), Life Reborn: Jewish Displaced Persons, 1945-1951 (2000), The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk (2001), Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust (2003), State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda (2009). He is the author of two companion volumes to the exhibitions, The Art and Politics of Arthur Szyk, and State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda (with Susan Bachrach).

Prior to coming to the Museum, Dr. Luckert taught European history at several campuses of the State University of New York and at George Mason University.  In 1993, he received his Ph.D. in modern European history from Binghamton University.

Warren Marcus is the Education Specialist in the Global Classroom branch of the Education Division of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.  This office develops new ways to consolidate and distribute the museum’s information and message worldwide. As part of this effort, he works with international student and military groups. Mr. Marcus was the Director of Teacher Workshops and Conferences for ten years and organized and presented teacher workshops for up to 500 teachers annually around the nation and in Washington, D.C. His online workshop is visited by thousands of learners each month. He directed the Belfer National Conferences for Teachers at the Museum from 1997-2006 and was the lead instructor for 200 high school teachers at the Conferences in 1995 and 1996.  Mr. Marcus taught middle and high school for seventeen years, also serving in a variety of administrative positions, including twice as department chair. He was a national finalist for social studies teacher of the year in 1992 in The Disney Channel Salutes the American Teacher Awards Program, and in 2001 and 2002, served as a national judge for the program. 

He is a graduate of Brown University and received a Master's Degree in Education from Harvard University.

Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, PhD, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington, was named a CSIS counselor in March 2007. Cardinal McCarrick was born in New York City in 1930. He was ordained to the priesthood by Cardinal Francis Spellman in 1958 and earned a PhD in sociology from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. His first assignment was at Catholic University, where he served as Assistant Chaplain, Dean of Students, and Director of Development. In 1965, he was named President of the Catholic University of Puerto Rico in Ponce. In 1969, he returned to New York to serve first as Associate Secretary for Education and then as Cardinal Terence Cooke’s secretary. Named an Auxiliary Bishop of New York in 1977, he served as vicar of East Manhattan and the Harlems.

In 1981, Pope John Paul II appointed him the first Bishop of Metuchen, a newly established diocese in New Jersey, and in 1986, he was named Archbishop of Newark. In January 2001, he was installed as Archbishop of Washington, a position he held until May 2006. In February 2001, he was elevated to the College of Cardinals. Cardinal McCarrick is past chair of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committees on Domestic Policy, International Policy, Migration, and Aid to the Church in Central and Eastern Europe. He has also served on the Administrative, Doctrine, Laity, Latin America, and Missions Committees.

He has been chancellor of the Catholic University of America and Chairman of the board of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. He serves on the board of Catholic Relief Services. For the Vatican, he serves on the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant Peoples, and Pontifical Commission for Latin America. He was one of fifteen U.S. bishops elected to serve as a member of the 1997 Synod for America and of the Post-Synodal Council. He is a founding member of the Papal Foundation and has served as its president since 1997. Cardinal McCarrick has visited many nations as a human rights advocate, and in 1996, then-Archbishop McCarrick was invited to serve on the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Religious Freedom Abroad. In 1998, he was one of three American clerics invited to China to discuss religious freedoms in that country. From 1999 to 2001, he was a member of the U.S. Commission for International Religious Freedom. In 2000, he was honored by the presidents of Lebanon and the United States for his work on human rights, just two of many honors he has received. In April 2005, Cardinal McCarrick was one of 115 cardinals who participated in the conclave that elected Pope Benedict XVI as the successor to Pope John Paul II. Cardinal McCarrick speaks five languages: English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

Reverend Dennis McManus, D.Litt. has taught at Georgetown University since 1997. He holds a master’s degree in historical ethics from Georgetown University and a doctorate from Drew University in historical theology. At present, he is on the faculty of the Program for Jewish Civilization in the School of Foreign Service, where he offers courses in the history of Christian-Jewish conflict, autobiography in the Holocaust, and the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue.

Father McManus has served for the last four years as Consultant for Jewish Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), where he staffs the two official dialogues between the Jewish community and the Catholic Church in the United States. He also belongs to the Church Relations Committee of the United States Memorial Holocaust Museum and from 1999-2008 was a member of the editorial board of The Stimulus Foundation of New York that publishes works devoted to Catholic-Jewish history and relations. From 2009- 2011, he was the personal delegate of the Archbishop of New York to the Jewish community of New York City. Since 1997, Fr. McManus has membered on the board of directors of the Anti-Defamation League/USCCB joint program in Holocaust education known as Bearing Witness, offered nationally in Catholic dioceses. He is also director of the newly founded Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education at Georgetown University, which sponsors a weeklong, intensive program in Holocaust education for high school teachers from across the U.S. Additionally, he teaches annually in the Holocaust education workshop at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City.

Fr. McManus’ research interests lie in two fields: first, the relationship of Jews with early Christians and second, the meaning of Judaism in Roman Catholic liturgy. As general editor of The Ancient Christian Writers Series (Paulist Press, New York) from 1993-2007, and Drew University’s translation editor from 1995-1997 for its new series, Ancient Christian Commentary (IVPress, Downers Grove), he helped to highlight the interaction of Christianity and Judaism in early Church writing. Fr. McManus has written numerous articles on this and other historical topics in The Word Set Free (ADL, 2000); The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian-Jewish Relations (2002) and “The Jewish Background of the Celibacy of Jesus” in The Celibacy of Jesus (St. Botolph Press, 2013).

Rebecca Recant is Assistant Regional Director of Education at the Anti-Defamation League. A 2009 graduate of Tufts University in International Relations, Recant worked as Education and Development Associate from 2010 to 2011.

Kristina Rennerstedt is the Counselor for Cultural Affairs at the Embassy of Sweden in Washington, DC. She also serves as the Chair of the Board of the Swedish Royal Opera.

Kristina is educated as a lawyer and entered into a traditional career as a judge in Sweden. For seven years she served as a State Secretary at the Ministry of Justice. She held the position as Director General at the Swedish Arts Council for seven years and she has also served as the Head of the Swedish Broadcasting Commission.

Ori Z. Soltes, PhD, is Goldman Professorial Lecturer in Theology and Fine Arts at Georgetown University, and former Director and Curator of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum in Washington, DC, where he curated over 80 exhibitions. He has taught and lectured in 23 other universities and museums throughout the country, on subjects ranging from the Arab-Israeli conflict to the body in ancient art. Before and since his years as a museum director, he has guest-curated exhibitions across the United States and overseas. Professor Soltes was educated in classics and philosophy at Haverford College, in classics at Princeton University and Johns Hopkins University and in interdisciplinary studies at Union University. He is the author of over 150 articles, exhibition catalogues, essays and books on a wide range of topics, and the writer and narrator of over 30 documentary videos. Some of his books include: Our Sacred Signs: How Christian, Jewish and Muslim Art Draw from the Same Source, (Westview Press); The Ashen Rainbow: Essays on the Arts and the Holocaust, (Bartleby Press); Searching for Oneness: Mysticism in the Jewish, Christian and Muslim Traditions (Rowman and Littlefield) and Untangling the Tangled Web: Why the Middle East is a Mess (Bartleby Press).

Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, Nuncio, JUD, is the Apostolic Nuncio to the United States since October 2011. Born in Varese, Viganò was ordained a priest on 24 March 1968. He earned a doctorate in utroque iure (both canon and civil law). He entered the diplomatic service of the Holy See in 1973, and worked at the papal diplomatic mission in Iraq and Great Britain and then, from 1978 to 1989, the Secretariat of State. He was named Special Envoy and Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg in April 1989. In April 1992, he was appointed Titular Archbishop of Ulpiana and Apostolic Nuncio to Nigeria by Pope John Paul II, who, with Cardinals Franciszek Macharski and Angelo Sodano serving as co-consecrators, gave him episcopal ordination in April of that year. While he was Apostolic Nuncio to Nigeria Pope John Paul II visited the country in 1997. At the close of his mission to Nigeria, he was assigned to functions within the Secretariat. He served as Secretary-General of the Governatorate of Vatican City State (Holy See) from 2009-2011, until he became Secretary General of the Governatorate on 16 July 2009.

Irene Weiss was born Iren Fogel on November 21, 1930, in Bótrágy, Czechoslovakia (now Batrad’, Ukraine) to Meyer and Leah Fogel. Meyer owned a lumber yard, and Leah managed their home and cared for Irene and her five siblings—Moshe, Edit, Reuven, Gershon, and Serena. When Nazi Germany dismembered Czechoslovakia in 1939, Bótrágy came under Hungarian rule and Hungarian Authorities intensified their persecution of Jews. Hungarian authorities banned Jews from attending school, confiscated Jewish businesses, and required thousands of Jewish men to be inducted into Hungarian forced labor brigades under military command. In April 1944 Hungarian authorities rounded up tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews, including the Fogels, and crowded them into a ghetto in Munkács, a brick factory that was never intended to house people, where hundreds of families were forced to live in inhumane conditions. Shortly after their arrival, all girls under the age of 16 were forced to have their heads shaved. Irene’s mother gave her a scarf to wear around her baldhead, which made Irene look older and probably helped save her life during a future selection at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Irene and her family were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau over a two-month period beginning in May 1944. Nearly 425,000 Jews were deported from Hungary to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Irene was 13 years old. Upon arrival at the camp, her mother, three younger siblings, and older brother were killed. SS authorities selected Irene and her sister Serena for forced labor, while their father was forced to work as a Sonderkommando, removing corpses from the gas chambers and cremating them. While still in the camp, Irene’s aunt learned through a boy from their hometown that when Meyer could no longer perform this work, the SS shot and killed him.

When the SS evacuated them to Ravensbrück, Irene, Serena, and two maternal aunts, Rose and Piri Mermelstein, worked in the “Canada” section of Birkenau—storage warehouses located near two crematoria –for eight months. On January 1945 the SS forcibly evacuated them on foot to the Ravensbrück concentration camp in central Germany. Three weeks later, the SS transported them to Neustadt-Glewe, a subcamp of Ravensbrück, east of Hamburg. There, Piri became ill and was killed. One day during morning roll call, the SS separated Serena and other prisoners from the group, deeming them too weak and emaciated to work. Irene said to a camp guard, “She is my sister,” and was then allowed to go with Serena. The sisters heard from other inmates that they would be sent back to Ravensbrück, where there were gas chambers. They were locked in a room with other prisoners to await the transport truck, but it never arrived. As Soviet troops approached, the SS personnel fled, leaving the camp unguarded, and the prisoners gradually left. Irene, Serena, and Rose found temporary shelter in an empty house in a nearby town. Soon after, the three women made their way to Prague to look for relatives or other survivors. After the War they found an uncle, Joseph Mermelstein, who in 1938 had immigrated from his hometown to Palestine and returned as a soldier in the Czech Legion of the British Army. A few aunts and uncles survived, but Irene and Serena were the only surviving children from the family. Irene, Serena, and Rose lived together with their surviving relatives in Teplice-Šanov in the Sudetenland. Irene attended a Czech school, Serena worked in a factory, and Rose remained at home, ill with tuberculosis. With the sponsorship of relatives and financial aid from the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Irene, Serena, and Rose immigrated to New York in 1947. Irene married Martin Weiss in 1949, and they moved to northern Virginia in 1953. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in education from American University and taught in the Fairfax County Public School system in Virginia for 13 years. Irene and Martin have three children and four grandchildren, and Irene is a volunteer at the United Stat s Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Lenore J. Weitzman, PhD, was educated at Cornell University (B.S.), Columbia University (Ph.D. in Sociology), and Yale Law School. She has published 5 books including the award-winning The Divorce Revolution: the Unexpected Social and Economic Consequences for Women and Children in America (The Free Press), which focused attention on the economic hardships that no-fault divorce laws created for women and children. Her research led to the passage of 14 new laws in California and influenced national legislation on child support and pensions. Lenore Weitzman’s recent work focuses on the Holocaust. Dr. Weitzman coedited Women in the Holocaust (Yale) with Dalia Ofer which became a finalist for two Jewish Book Awards. Dr. Weitzman is now writing a book on The Kashariyot: the women couriers in the Jewish resistance in the Holocaust. She also has a long-standing interest in (and published several articles on) Jews who thwarted and evaded the Nazis by passing on false documents.

In 2011 Weitzman was invited to give the keynote address to the United Nations General Assembly on Holocaust Remembrance Day. Her other honors include a Guggenheim fellowship; membership at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton; a Fulbright Fellowship in Israel; the Kroener fellowship in Holocaust studies at Oxford; and fellowships from Ford, Rockefeller, NSF, and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in the United States. In 2007 she received a national medal as a “Feminist Who Changed America”.

Lenore Weitzman is also a dedicated teacher and has been a Professor at Stanford University, the University of California, and Harvard University -- where she received Harvard’s Phi Beta Kappa distinguished teaching award. She is now the Clarence Robinson Professor of Sociology and Law at George Mason University. For the past 15 years Weitzman has been teaching courses on the Holocaust and has created a “Master Class” on “The Major Events of the Holocaust through the Eyes of Survivors.” Each program of the 15 two-hour video programs examines one chapter in the history of the Holocaust with an eyewitness survivor. These narratives, which are supplemented by photographs, archival materials, and historical footage, provide a human perspective for the numbing statistics and help us understand the real-life effects of abstract policies like "the aryanization of property" and "ghettoization”. The videos were taped in graduate level seminars over a two-year period and aired on GMU-TV in the greater Washington DC area.

In addition to her academic work, Lenore Weitzman serves on the Board of Directors of the Jewish Book Council and is the former Chair of the Board of Directors of Women for Women International, a non-profit organization founded to help the women who suffered in the rape camps and concentration camps in the former Yugoslavia (which later expanded to Rwanda, Kosovo, and the Congo.)

Karski Institute 2012

Galit Baram was appointed to the position of Counselor for Public and Academic Affairs at the Embassy of Israel in Washington D.C. in August 2009. Counselor Baram joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1994. From 2006 to 2009 she was Counselor for Economic and Commercial Affairs in Cairo. From 1998 to 2003 she was First Secretary for Political Affairs in Moscow, where she covered Russian foreign policy.

During her time at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem she was the Assistant to the Senior Deputy Director General for North America, and Assistant to the Director General. She also was Deputy Director of the Eurasia Department, covering Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Afghanistan.

Counselor Baram holds a bachelor’s degree in Near East Archeology and English Literature from Tel Aviv University, and a Masters degree in American Studies from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is married to a fellow Israeli diplomat and has two children.

Deborah Batiste is the Project Director for "Echoes and Reflections," the award-winning program that includes everything educators need to teach the complex issues of the Holocaust to 21st century students, at the Anti-Defamation League.

Victoria Barnett, PhD is the Staff Director for the Committee on Church Relations and the Holocaust at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Ms. Barnett has helped create academic and public programs, panels, and symposia on Christianity and the Holocaust with institutions around the country. Her publications include Bystanders: Conscience and Complicity during the Holocaust (1999) and For the Soul of the People: Protestant Protest against Hitler (1992).She is also a prominent Bonhoeffer scholar and one of the general editors of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English Edition, the complete English translation of Bonhoeffer’s works.

Jacques Berlinerblau, PhD holds separate doctorates in ancient Near Eastern Languages and Literatures, and in Sociology. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Berlinerblau has published on a wide variety of issues ranging from the composition of the Hebrew Bible, to the sociology of heresy, to modern Jewish intellectuals, to African-American and Jewish-American relations. His articles on these and other subjects have appeared in Biblica, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Semeia, Biblical Interpretation, Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages, Hebrew Studies, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, and History of Religions.

He has published four books, including Heresy in the University: The Black Athena Controversy and the Responsibility of American Intellectuals (Rutgers University Press) and The Secular Bible: Why Nonbelievers Must Take Religion Seriously (Cambridge University Press), and most recently, Thumpin’ It: The Use and Abuse of the Bible in Today’s Presidential Politics, released in January 2008 (Westminster John Knox). His upcoming book, How to Be Secular: A Call to Arms for Religious Freedom (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) will be available in September.

Laura Bishop, PhD graduated from Wells College with a B.A. in biology and a self-designed, interdisciplinary minor in science and human values. Laura received her Ph.D. from Georgetown University in Philosophy, with a concentration in Bioethics. Her research interests include the role of the family in medical decision making, bioethics education in secondary schools, teaching ethics and curriculum development, bioethics themes in movies, and dental ethics. 

As the KIE Academic Program Officer for Outreach, Library, and International Initiatives, she focuses on curricular and extra-curricular initiatives for undergraduates involving the BRL and KIE; welcoming visiting researchers; and working with professional groups and organizations to identify possible collaborative opportunities for bioethics education. She is delighted to be working closely with the Undergraduate Bioethics Society at Georgetown as they prepare to host the National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference in 2013.

Douglas Davidson, a member of the Senior Foreign Service, became Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues in April 2010. As such he is responsible for developing and implementing U.S. policy pertaining to the return of Holocaust-era assets to their rightful owners, compensation for wrongs committed during the Holocaust, and Holocaust remembrance. 

From 2004 to 2008 Davidson was Head of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe's Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina. This 600-person mission worked to strengthen human rights and rule of law, to return displaced persons and refugees to their pre-war homes, and to help build the institutions of democracy.

From 2001 to 2004, Davidson was Deputy U.S. Representative to the OSCE in Vienna. In that capacity he participated in a number of multilateral negotiations, including those that led to the first OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism in 2003.

His other overseas diplomatic assignments have included Kosovo (also on detail to the OSCE) in the immediate aftermath of its most recent conflict; Zagreb and Belgrade from the end of the war in former Yugoslavia to the eve of the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia; and Peshawar in the early nineteen-eighties during the Soviet-Afghan war. From the late 1989 until early 1993 he was an Assistant Press Secretary for Foreign Affairs at the White House.

He has also been a Distinguished Visiting Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. He was most recently Senior State Department Advisor to the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe ("the Helsinki Commission").

Davidson holds a B.A. from Lawrence University and an A.M. from Brown University, both in Classics. From 2000 to 2001 he was a member of the Senior Seminar, the State Department's executive leadership and management training program.

Stacy Bernard Davis is the Senior Advisor to the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism in the Office of International Religious Freedom in the Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor.  

Prior to taking this position, Ms. Davis was the Public Engagement Officer in the Bureau of Political-Military Affair's Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement, focusing on public-private partnerships, outreach and public affairs.  She also managed multilateral relationships as the Secretary of the 25-donor nation Mine Action Support Group, chaired by the United States in 2006-2007 and 2009-2011, with close coordination from the United Nations interagency Mine Action Team.  Ms. Davis promoted Public-Private Partnerships for Humanitarian Mine Action, producing a regular newsletter, speaking publicly, and handling all public affairs for the office, producing press releases, fact sheets, and an annual report of U.S. Government efforts in conventional weapons destruction.

After working in international private banking and financial public relations, Ms. Davis joined the Department of State as a Presidential Management Intern in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM).  She served in a variety of positions in the PM Bureau:  in the Center for Defense Trade; in support of the UN Special Commission on Iraq and the International Atomic Energy Association; in the Office of Regional Non-proliferation (working on nuclear non-proliferation policy for South Africa and South America); and in the Office of Strategic Policy and Negotiations (developing anti-personnel landmine policy).  

Ms. Davis was born in New York City.  She received her B.S. from Cornell University and earned her M.A.L.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.  She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband and two sons.

Father Patrick Desbois, president of the Yahad–In Unum Association, has devoted his life to confronting Anti-Semitism and furthering Catholic-Jewish understanding. Since 2001, he has led a truly historic undertaking. 

Working closely with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum staff and using the Museum’s archives to aid his search, he and his team have crisscrossed the countryside in Ukraine in an effort to locate every mass grave and site at which Jews were killed during the Holocaust. To date, they have identified 800 of an estimated 2,000 such locations. They are also collecting artifacts and, most significantly, recording video testimonies from eyewitnesses—many of whom are speaking publicly for the first time. These invaluable testimonies will become part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Father Desbois’ extraordinary work to preserve the memory of Ukraine’s former Jewish community and to advance understanding of the crimes committed there during the Holocaust has received international media attention.

Rabbi Elliot N. Dorff, PhD is a Conservative rabbi. He is the Sol & Anne Dorff Distinguished Service Professor in Philosophy at the American Jewish University (formerly the University of Judaism) in California (where he is also Rector), author and a bio-ethicist. For more than thirty years as a Visiting Professor, he has taught a course on Jewish law at UCLA School of Law. Dorff is an expert in the philosophy of Conservative Judaism, Bioethics, and acknowledged within the Conservative community as an expert devisor of Jewish law. 

Dorff was ordained as a rabbi from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1970. He earned a Ph.D in philosophy from Columbia University in 1971. Dorff is the chairman of the Rabbinical Assembly's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards, and has written many responsa (opinion papers and legal rulings) on various aspects of Jewish law and philosophy. Rabbi Dorff was awarded the Journal of Law and Religion’s Lifetime Achievement Award and holds three honorary doctoral degrees. Rabbi Dorff is Chair of the Conservative Movement's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards and served on the editorial committee of Etz Hayim, the new Torah commentary for the Conservative Movement. He has chaired three scholarly organizations: the Academy of Jewish Philosophy, the Jewish Law Association, and the Society of Jewish Ethics. He is also Immediate Past President of the Academy of Judaic, Christian, and Islamic Studies. In Spring 1993, he served on the Ethics Committee of Hillary Rodham Clinton's Health Care Task Force.

In March 1997 and May 1999, he testified on behalf of the Jewish tradition on the subjects of human cloning and stem cell research before the President's National Bioethics Advisory Commission. In 1999 and 2000 he was part of the Surgeon General’s commission to draft a Call to Action for Responsible Sexual Behavior; and from 2000 to 2002 he served on the National Human Resources Protections Advisory Commission, charged with reviewing and revising the federal guidelines for protecting human subjects in research projects. Rabbi Dorff is also a member of an advisory committee for the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History on the social, ethical, and religious implications of their exhibits.

Witold Dzielski presently works in the Political Section of the Polish Embassy in Washington D.C. He has held this role since 2007. His portfolio includes EU-US relations as well as Polish-Jewish affairs. Prior to his work for the Polish Ministry of the Foreign Affairs, Mr. Dzielski was actively engaged in Poland’s civic society organizations. Among others, he was the President and founder of US MATTERS, an organization that dealt with transatlantic relations; Office Director at the Pro Publico Bono Foundation, that aims to promote civic activity in Poland; and a Public Relations Representative for the Oswiecim Institute of Human Rights. He was also a lecturer at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. In his free time he enjoys studying aikido, playing tennis and kayaking on the Potomac.

David C. Friedman is the Anti-Defamation League's Washington, D.C. Regional Director. He also serves as the director of ADL’s work with law enforcement throughout the country.

David has helped create a number of national programs and initiatives. These include: The District of Columbia Bias Crimes Task Force, a coalition of law enforcement and community organizations co-founded with then U.S. Attorney Eric H. Holder, Jr., which was the model for the Hate Crime Task Forces established by the U.S. Department of Justice throughout the country; Law Enforcement and Society, a partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which has trained more than 75,000 law enforcement professionals and is a required part of training for all FBI New Agents;  ADL’s Advanced Training School, a counter-terrorism program that has trained more than 750 federal, state and local police commanders throughout the nation; ADL’s National Counter-Terrorism Seminar, a program which takes  American law enforcement leaders to Israel to study counter-terrorism strategies and tactics; Bearing Witness, a joint program of ADL, the Archdiocese of Washington, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the National Catholic Educational Association; and ADL In Concert Against Hate, an annual event at the Kennedy Center featuring the National Symphony Orchestra and honoring heroes in the fight against hatred, injustice, extremism and terrorism.   

David joined ADL in 1985 as an Assistant Regional Director in the Washington, D.C. Regional Office. In 1986 he was appointed to serve as the first director of the ADL’s Northern Ohio Regional Office, based in Cleveland. He returned to Washington, D.C. in 1988 to assume his current position. In 2001 he was asked to assume responsibility for overseeing the ADL’s national initiatives with law enforcement. David is a recipient of the Milton A. Senn Award for Professional Excellence, ADL’s highest staff award. 

Born and raised in New York City. David has a BA from Brandeis University and two Masters from Columbia University. David and his wife, Patti, an educator, have been married for thirty-six years. Patti and David have two children, Sylvie, 28, a marketing director for a start-up company in Washington, DC, and Jack, 25, a chef in San Francisco.

Nesse Godin (Galperin) was born on March 28, 1928 to Sara and Pinchas Galperin, an observant Jewish family in Siauliai, Lithuania. Three year after the Nazis invaded Poland, on June 26, 1941, Siauliai was occupied by the Nazis.  In August 1941, Nesse and her family were among the Jewish population forced to move into the Siauliai Ghetto.

On November 5, 1943, approximately 1,700 people, including Nesse’s father Pinchas Galperin, were deported to Auschwitz. Nesse, her mother, and her brothers managed to avoid the Kinderaction (children’s selection) because they worked outside the ghetto. In 1944, the few Jews remaining in the Siauliai ghetto were deported to the Stutthof Concentration Camp. Nesse became prisoner number 54015 and was separated from her mother and brother. She was looked after by Jewish women who protected and advised her on how to survive. She was deported to four other slave labor camps until January 1945 when she was in a group of 1,000 female prisoners sent on a death march. Only 200 women were still alive when the group was liberated by the Soviet Army on March 10, 1945. 

Nesse spent six weeks recuperating in a makeshift hospital in Chinow (Chynowie), Poland and was then assigned a foster mother. They traveled to Lodz, Poland where Nesse met a woman from Siauliai who told her that her mother, Sara, was somewhere on the border between Germany and Poland. After weeks of traveling and searching, they were reunited. In order to begin rebuilding their lives, Sara decided that either she or Nesse would need to marry. Nesse was 17 when Sara asked Yankel (Jack) Godin, a survivor from Poland, to marry her daughter and join their family. The Galperin/Godins relocated to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp in Bavaria where they were reunited with Jechezkel. 

In 1950, the Galperin/Godins immigrated to the United States and settled in Washington DC. Nesse and Jack have three children, seven grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. In honor of the women who saved her life, Nesse is a passionate advocate for Holocaust education and awareness and has been a volunteer with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum since prior to its opening.

Joshua Kretman is an Attorney-Adviser in the Office of the Legal Adviser, Office of International Claims and Investment Disputes, Department of State, in which capacity he advises on issues related to Holocaust claims. Prior to working in the Office of the Legal Adviser, Joshua clerked for the Honorable Janet Bond Arterton in the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut. Joshua graduated from Stanford Law School.

Carol Lancaster, PhD has been SFS Dean since April 2010 after serving as Interim Dean beginning in 2009. She has published numerous books and articles on the politics of foreign aid, the politics of development, and development in Africa including Foreign Aid: Diplomacy, Development, Domestic Politics (University of Chicago Press). Her most recent book is George Bush's Foreign Aid: Transformation or Chaos?, published by the Center for Global Development, Washington, D.C., 2008. She is a professor of politics and was previously the Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development and a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Africa. 

Dean Lancaster serves on the board of the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, Vital Voices and the Society for International Development and is a trustee of the American University of Afghanistan and Nyumbani. She is a non-resident fellow at the Center for Global Development and currently co-editing a book on the politics of development.

Eric Langenbacher, PhD is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of the Senior Honors Program in the Department of Government, Georgetown University, where he teaches courses on comparative politics, political culture and political films. He studied in Canada before starting graduate work in the Government Department and Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown in 1996. He was awarded a Fulbright grant in 1999-2000 and held the Ernst Reuter Fellowship at the Free University of Berlin in 1999-2000, the Hopper Memorial Fellowship at Georgetown in 2000-2001, and was selected School of Foreign Service faculty member of the year by the 2009 graduating class. He has been teaching in the Government Department since Fall 2002, and also has taught at George Washington University and in Buenos Aires, Argentina. 

His dissertation, defended with distinction in September 2002, forms the basis of his book manuscript “Memory Regimes and Political Culture in Contemporary Germany” currently under review at several presses. He has also published edited volumes, "Lauching the Grand Coalition: The 2005 Bundestag Election and the Future of German Politics," with Yossi Shain) "Power and the Past: Collective Memory and International Relations," "Between Left and Right: The 2009 Bundestag Election and the Transformation of the German Party System," and (with Jeffrey Anderson) "From the Bonn to the Berlin Republic: Germany at the Twentieth Anniversary of Unification."

His research interests center on political culture, collective memory, political institutions, public opinion and German and European politics. He has published in German Politics and Society, German Politics, The Canadian Journal of Political Science, The International Journal of Politics and Ethics and in several edited volumes. He has also planned and run dozens of short programs on various aspects of U.S. politics and society for visitors from abroad.

Robert J. Lieber, PhD is Professor of Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University, where he has previously served as Chair of the Government Department and Interim Chair of Psychology. He is an authority on American foreign policy and U.S. relations with the Middle East and Europe. He was born and raised in Chicago, received his undergraduate education at the University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. at Harvard. He has held fellowships from the Guggenheim, Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has also taught at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California, Davis, and has been Visiting Fellow at the Atlantic Institute in Paris, the Brookings Institution in Washington, and Fudan University in Shanghai. 

Professor Lieber latest book entitled, Power and Willpower in The American Future: Why the US is Not Destined to Decline, has been published in Spring 2012 by Cambridge University Press. His most recent book prior to this is The American Era: Power and Strategy for the 21st Century (Cambridge University Press, 2007). As one reviewer has described it, “This may be the best book on American foreign policy written since September 11.” In addition, Lieber is author or editor of fourteen other books on international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and energy security. 

Professor Lieber has lectured widely in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In the policy realm, he has been a foreign policy adviser in several presidential campaigns and consultant to the State Department and for National Intelligence Estimates. His articles and opeds have appeared in scholarly journals, magazines and newspapers, including International Security, Foreign Policy, American Political Science Review, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The National Interest, Commentary, Internationale Politik (Berlin), Politique Etrangere (Paris), International Affairs (London), Harper’s, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Ha’aretz (Tel Aviv), and Asharq Al-Awsat (London), among others, and his media appearances have included The News Hour with Jim Lehrer on PBS TV, ABC TV's Good Morning America and Nightline, NBC and CBS network news, the O'Reilly Factor on Fox TV, Voice of America, BBC World Service, Al Jazeera, and other radio and TV programs in Europe, the Arab world and Israel. Among his, assorted credits is a walk-on part in the Alfred Hitchcock film classic, NORTH BY NORTHWEST 

Deborah E. Lipstadt, PhD is the Dorot Associate Professor of Modern Jewish and Holocaust Studies at Emory University in Atlanta. Her latest book, Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory, is the first full-length study of those who attempt to deny the Holocaust. The book has met with wide acclaim, and was declared by The New York Times to be one of the notable books of 1993. She is writing a book about the impact of the American experience on the values of ethnic and religious groups. 

Professor Lipstadt has written the critically acclaimed Beyond Belief: The American Press and the Coming of the Holocaust (Free Press/Macmillan, 1986, 1993). She has taught at the University of California at Los Angeles and Occidental College, as well as at the University of Washington at Seattle. Dr. Lipstadt has participated in the Konrad Adenauer Foundation’s Jewish-German exchange program, and has visited Germany at that government’s request to consult on methods of teaching Jewish history and the Holocaust, particularly in former East Germany.

She has contributed to and has been quoted in a variety of newspapers and magazines, and has appeared on CNN, Sixty Minutes, The Today Show, Good Morning America, National Public Radio’s Fresh Air, and The Charlie Rose Show. Because she refuses to debate Holocaust deniers, she has declined appearances on a number of national television programs.

Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY) is currently serving her twelfth term in Congress, representing parts of Westchester and Rockland Counties. She was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1988 and served in the Democratic Leadership in 2001 and 2002 as the first woman and the first New Yorker to chair the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. 

A member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee, Lowey serves as Ranking Democrat of the State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee and a senior Member of the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee and Homeland Security Subcommittee.

On the State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Subcommittee, Lowey has also worked to ensure that diplomacy and development remain key pillars of our national security strategy, particularly in Iraq and Afghanistan. Called "one of the engines of pro-Israel activity on Capitol Hill" by the Forward, Lowey has been a leading Congressional proponent of a strong U.S.-Israel relationship and the Appropriations Committee's chief advocate of the annual U.S. aid package to Israel. In 2007, she was chosen by Speaker Nancy Pelosi to serve as a member of the Select Intelligence Oversight Panel, recommended by the bipartisan 9/11 Commission to coordinate classified programs and funding.

Lowey was born in the Bronx; graduated from the Bronx High School of Science; and received a Bachelor's Degree from Mount Holyoke College. She served as Assistant Secretary of State for the State of New York before being elected Congress.

Fr. Dennis McManus, D.Litt. has taught at Georgetown University since 1997. He holds a master’s degree in historical ethics from Georgetown University and a doctorate from Drew University in historical theology. At present, he is on the faculty of the Program for Jewish Civilization in the School of Foreign Service, where he offers courses in the history of Christian-Jewish conflict, autobiography in the Holocaust, and the theory and practice of interreligious dialogue.

Father McManus has served for the last four years as Consultant for Jewish Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), where he staffs the two official dialogues between the Jewish community and the Catholic Church in the United States. He also belongs to the Church Relations Committee of the United States Memorial Holocaust Museum and from 1999-2008 was a member of the editorial board of The Stimulus Foundation of New York that publishes works devoted to Catholic-Jewish history and relations. From 2009- 2011, he was the personal delegate of the Archbishop of New York to the Jewish community of New York City. Since 1997, Fr. McManus has membered on the board of directors of the Anti-Defamation League/USCCB joint program in Holocaust education known as Bearing Witness, offered nationally in Catholic dioceses. He is also director of the newly founded Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Georgetown University, which sponsors a week-long, intensive program in Holocaust education for high school teachers from across the U.S. Additionally, he teaches annually in the Holocaust Education workshop at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City.

Fr. McManus’ research interests lie in two fields: first, the relationship of Jews with early Christians and second, the meaning of Judaism in Roman Catholic liturgy. As general editor of The Ancient Christian Writers Series (Paulist Press, New York) from 1993-2007, and Drew University’s translation editor from 1995-1997 for its new series, Ancient Christian Commentary (IVPress, Downers Grove), he helped to highlight the interaction of Christianity and Judaism in early Church writing. Fr. McManus has written numerous articles on this and other historical topics in The Word Set Free (ADL, 2000); The Cambridge Dictionary of Christian-Jewish Relations (2002) and “The Jewish Background of the Celibacy of Jesus” in The Celibacy of Jesus (Ignatius Press, 2012). A forthcoming work, “Benedict XVI, the Jews and the Liturgy,” will be published in the spring of 2013.

Peggy K. Pearlstein, PhD is the area specialist in the Hebraic Section of the Library of Congress. She holds an M.S. in library science from Southern Connecticut State College, an M.A. in Jewish Studies from Baltimore Hebrew University and a Ph.D. in American Studies from George Washington University. She has contributed to The Avotaynu Guide to Jewish Genealogy and American Women: A Library of Congress Guide for the Study of Women’s History and Culture in the United States. She has also written for Judaica Librarianship, Avotaynu: The International Review of Jewish Genealogy and Jewish Political Studies Review.

Jose Sanchez, PhD is a Professor Emeritus of History at St. Louis University. Prof. Sanchez received his Bachelor of Science at St. Louis University in 1954, his Masters of Arts from St. Louis University in 1957, and his Phd. from the University of Mexico in 1961. He has written four books entitled: Pius XII and the Holocaust: Understanding the Controversy, The Spanish Civil War as Religious Tragedy, Anticlericalism: A Brief History, and Reform and Reaction: the Politico-Religious Background of the Spanish Civil War.

Moran Stern, MA is an Adjunct Lecturer at Georgetown University where he teaches courses on Zionism and Jewish Civilization. Professor Stern holds an M.A. from Johns Hopkins University at SAIS in International Relations and International Economics with concentrations in Middle East Studies, and Emerging Markets. From St. Francis College, he holds a B.A. in Communications and Philosophy. He was formerly the Global Marketing Manager at SybilGroup.

Rabbi Harold S. White is Senior Advisor to and one of the founders of the Program for Jewish Civilization at Georgetown University. He completed his undergraduate degree at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, and received Rabbinical Ordination at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York City. He served as a U.S. Navy Chaplain at Parris Island, S.C. and with the 7th Fleet in the Pacific. He has served as a congregational rabbi at the Dublin Jewish Progressive Congregation in Dublin, Ireland, and at Beth Israel Congregation in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Director at the American University in Washington, D.C., for nine years prior to his being appointed Jewish Chaplain of Georgetown University. Rabbi White also was the associate rabbi of Temple Sinai in Washington, D.C. from 1980 -1985. He has lectured extensively nationwide.  

Rabbi White is the first rabbi to be appointed to a full time Campus Ministry position at a Catholic university. He has been very active in creating a milieu for Jewish-Christian theological dialogue in the greater Washington, D.C. area. He also serves as scholar-in-residence at Holy Cross Abbey in Berryville, VA, and at Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, PA. Rabbi White's current academic interests center on Kabbalistic Studies and the Judaic Roots of Christian scripture. He has been deeply involved in ecological issues and the protection of animal rights.